150 gallon tall on 2nd floor of apartment?

kentrob11

Premium Member
Anyone see any problems with having a 150 tall (48x24x30) on the second floor of an apartment? I would think it would be fine but I figured I'd check first....
 

sbeason

New member
kentrob,

I have a 72 gallon on the third floor and have no complaints or any floor settling sounds. I believe my subfloor is concrete though. I guess even if I went bigger, there should be no problem. -Steve
 

avp

New member
I've always put upstairs tanks against outside or weight bearing walls. The construction guys I work with tell me the floor is stronger where beams meet instead of the center of the beam.

-avp
 

miwoodar

Likey the bikey
Make sure it spans as many joists as possible.

You want the joists to run perpendicular to the front glass.
 

miwoodar

Likey the bikey
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10433948#post10433948 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by funman1
Yeah make sure it's next to an outside wall.

I've lost a couple of tanks by putting them against an outside wall. In my case it was on the south side of the house. The first warm day of spring...the AC wasn't turned on. Before I could get home from work the water was in the mid 90's.
 

superedge88

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10461704#post10461704 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by miwoodar
I've lost a couple of tanks by putting them against an outside wall. In my case it was on the south side of the house. The first warm day of spring...the AC wasn't turned on. Before I could get home from work the water was in the mid 90's.

Do you really think that putting the tank 10 feet across the room on an interior wall would have made the tank ten degrees cooler?:confused: If your house is that loosely insulated you have some major problems.
 

miwoodar

Likey the bikey
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10461752#post10461752 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by superedge88
Do you really think that putting the tank 10 feet across the room on an interior wall would have made the tank ten degrees cooler?:confused: If your house is that loosely insulated you have some major problems.

It was definitely not the finest house ever built. It made a huge difference though. 6" from the wall was easily 100 degrees while the other side of the room was in the 80's. The room had very poor air movement and a partial divider down the center that didn't help. It can make a difference - it doesn't in every case - but in my case it did.
 

TIMMYE

New member
How old is your aparment? How many floors is it? the reason I ask is normally around 5 floors they go to steel and concrete. Either way go on the outside wall if you dont know for sure, or know the joist direction. HTH Tim
 

prncalbrt

New member
the apartment i am in is older the moses himself and i have a 90g with 150lbs of LR in the middle of the apartment. i have no problems
 

Shortie

New member
Get renter's insurance and make sure it would cover a tank failure. If it goes, you are going to have some pretty upset people downstairs.
 

MalawianDude

New member
Get a fan to move air lol

I seen a bobcat shoving crap off a 5th floor hospital, think a lil tank would be ok on 2nd floor lol.
 

Roamer

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10466087#post10466087 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by MalawianDude
I seen a bobcat shoving crap off a 5th floor hospital, think a lil tank would be ok on 2nd floor lol.

I just have to point out that the way the floor in a hospital is constructed is WAY different than the way the floor in a house or even most apartments are constructed.

It is way stronger to support all the assorted point loads that will be at different locations in the hospital.

Anyone have any idea just how much an NMRI weighs? That bobcat just isn't that heavy...
 

MalawianDude

New member
LOL True, most apartments who have a balcony, if u look under the balcony u will see which way the floor boards run then, as most with their constructed just run the boards all the way through in the patio so they are all one in the same.
 

32flavors

New member
Renter's ins is GOOD advice. My policy covers aany damage caused by my tank under personal liability. I'm with State Farm--it even covered MY tank, while it was parked at a friends house for several months (I wasn't living there). I specifically asked as my friends live in an old Victorian with very old wood floors. My agent assured me if the tank was mine and I would sign an affidavit attesting to that--they would cover any damage caused by the tank.
 

kentrob11

Premium Member
Thanks for the info guys/gals....I picked up renters insurance today so it looks like I'm good to go...
 

kentrob11

Premium Member
Right now about $6 a month....I'm recently divorced and don't have much. I won't even have a tank for another few months!
 
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