build your own media baskets for bio cubes..help me upgrade my filter for my bio29

WXB

New member
I have looked at the media baskets for sale for the biocube29. I dont know why anyone would pay 50 bucks for that. I know it can be built for 10 bucks. has anyone ever built their own? if so do you have the mesurments for it or if you have one can you spill the beans of the mesurments of the media baskets?
I want to upgrade the filtration in the bio. What have you done that works or what have you heard that works? can anyone give me some Ideas for this. I was thinking of adding a canister filter to the bio but everyone is telling me NO NO NO dont do it. I dont see why its such a bad idea but can anyone help me out with some ideas?
 

SkullV

They Got My Number
I have looked at the media baskets for sale for the biocube29. I dont know why anyone would pay 50 bucks for that. I know it can be built for 10 bucks. has anyone ever built their own? if so do you have the mesurments for it or if you have one can you spill the beans of the mesurments of the media baskets?
I want to upgrade the filtration in the bio. What have you done that works or what have you heard that works? can anyone give me some Ideas for this. I was thinking of adding a canister filter to the bio but everyone is telling me NO NO NO dont do it. I dont see why its such a bad idea but can anyone help me out with some ideas?

Adding a canister is not a bad idea if you are willing to clean it out weekly, but weekly cleanings of the filter media is what you were having issues with in your other thread. That is why I said it would not be a good idea for you.

As far as a media basket goes, just mock it up with egg crate and then cut acrylic to fit. If you make the basket the entire length and width of the chamber you wouldn't even need the acrylic. The egg crate would be fine.
 

stevie-o

New member
I got one of the media baskets for my biocube it works great, and is built really solid. I thought about building one myself, but I'm lazy lol. It is however very good quality, and i am definitely satisfied with my 50 dollar purchase
 

ange062

New member
Worth the $50 IMO. Construction and fit are flawless, and the function is great. Honestly don't see being able to get away from changing filter media every other day though IMO, but I am a fairly heavy feeder. Besides, changing floss takes all of 30sec and cost is negligible ($6 worth of bonded floss should last at least 3-mo in my tank, or about 1-mo per sheet when cut to size).
 

WXB

New member
Here is the thing I have to get the nitrate levels down as fas as I can. If that means using a can filter to get it done ill change it out every hr till its down again. The media basket is a great idea. I don't mind changing out the floss like I do and changing out the filter for the bio every couple weeks. Looking at it from a $ point the media basket makes way more sence. I'm willing to try it out. If I can id rather make one than buying 3 of them. So if you have one and cand send some mesurements that would be great. If I have to do a can and that to get my levels back to normal so be it. Small price to pay to keep it healthy.
 

SkullV

They Got My Number
If you want to get the nitrate down fast just do an 80% water change. Make sure to match the temp and pH of your change water and it wont have any negative effects.

After that is done drop the media basket in and change the floss daily. Those spounges and bioballs that all of the AIO tanks come with need to be cleaned regularly.
 

kingfisher62

New member
I just built a makeshift one out of eggcrate. Sorry, no dimensions handy.
I cut 3 strips of eggcrate and formed a capital " H " sort of. Basically it is just a shelf to hold a bag of chemical media or two. I still use the drip tray which drops the water nicely on to the media and I just put a wad of polyester fluff on the tray on the tray where the water enters. I have chaeto under the shelf with a nanoglo light mounted on the outside window. If you cut the eggcrate right you can just snap the pieces together . Took me all of 20 minutes to put together.
 

WXB

New member
first thing I did a 70% water change with NO results. I could not believe that. I cleaned everything out. I just took out the bioballs and said hell with it. I have had a skimmer in for about a month now. and NOTHING is helping. someone had the same problem and said he is still having problems even 8 months later. I am trying to nip this as fast as i can. I dont like having the levels up. the corals are great the fish are great. BUT for how long?
Do you have any pictures of your media basket build? thanks
all of my prams are normal. I use Distilled water since day one. I just can not get under this nitrate problem.
 

ange062

New member
Sorry I can't offer more info as I am an NC28 guy, but suggest you ditch stock filtration, go with the InTank, and run floss/purigen/chemipure as I have had excellent results and maintained 0/0/0 on Ammonia/Nitrite/Nitrate since.

No sense wasting time building one, the InTank is excellent and worth every penny, best purchase I have made for my tank. Just get your prob fixed up quick!
 

jonewald

New member
I agree that the inTank is pricey for what it is, build quality aside. I've done similar to kingfisher with my biocube. Why don't you just measure the chamber yourself instead of asking everyone what inTank's media basket dimensions are? Then, you can make one to fit on your own very easily.
 

THE ROOK

New member
70% water change & no drop in nitrates? Somethings up.
1.Are you using RODI water?
2. Have you tested the tds of it?
3. Are you sure you don't have a bad nitrate kit? Have a LFS re-test for you.
Just some thoughts.
 

SkullV

They Got My Number
70% water change & no drop in nitrates? Somethings up.
1.Are you using RODI water?
2. Have you tested the tds of it?
3. Are you sure you don't have a bad nitrate kit? Have a LFS re-test for you.
Just some thoughts.

That is exactly what I am thinking. If your water is 0TDS, your test kit is verified good, and you did a 70% water change then these are the steps I would take before you try anything else:

  1. Test fresh made saltwater with your salt mix -- some batches have been known to contain Nitrate/Phosphate
  2. Put one piece of your LR in a bucket with saltwater for a week and test Nitrate after -- your rock may be leeching nitrate
  3. If rock is Leeching Nitrate Cook Rock 33% at a time
 

WXB

New member
I am asking for the mesurments from someone who has had done it and it will save waste of materials make the build go much faster. if some one has done it, it makes sence to ask and get the information. Just my thinking on that. saving my self the trial and error process if i can. smarter not harder.


The water DI water. I tested it. I have taken my water after I tested it to 3 LFS and all of them have the same results. So my test kit is good. I have cleaned out the filter parts as best as I could. I am going to make a fuge in the back as the next step. the rock idea is a great idea. the only thing i dont get is the cooking the rock. I have sooo much life in this rock i can not do that. I will pull some rock and see whats what. the main cause is moving the rock spiking the nitrate levels. trick is getting it down?

This is making me a bit mad. My coral and fish are happy as hell. so i am lucky there. I have been doing 7 gal water changes every 3 days with no luck. cutting down on their feeding. I hold their frozen food on tweezers and they eat it all. so nothing if much is being wasted. I have been doing everything i can think of as well as others suggestions. I am thankful for all of your ideas and help. Ill keep trying if you keep sending me more ideas.
 
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WXB

New member
Isit not over stocked. It has 3 small fish 30 to 40 lbs of rock. It is not an over stocking issue. Its been up for a good year and a half. Water changes like clock work. Never had a spike untill I moved some rock. Now my nitrate levels are up. Trying like hell to get them down.
 

SkullV

They Got My Number
the rock idea is a great idea. the only thing i dont get is the cooking the rock. I have sooo much life in this rock i can not do that. I will pull some rock and see whats what. the main cause is moving the rock spiking the nitrate levels. trick is getting it down?

Cooking the rock does not mean physically putting it in a pot and cooking it. Basically you are "re-curing" the rock with a huge amount of water changes to remove any bound up nutrients/detritus. If done properly it will not harm any micro-fauna or beneficial bacteria.

Have you tested a batch of FRESHLY made saltwater? Honestly if you did a 70% water change and saw no immediate drop in nitrate then something is seriously wrong with your test kit, your RODI source, or your salt. That level of dilution should cause an immediate HUGE drop in nitrates no matter what is going on in the tank.

Here is the process for cooking your rock (by SeanT):
Dave,
Sure thing.
But before I do I just want to say that Bomber instructed me how to do it several months ago and it works great. So it is his process that I am trying to make popular and cause fellow hobbyists a lot less heartache in the long term.
The purpose of "cooking" your rocks is to have tha bacteria consume all (or as much) organic material and PO4 stored on, and in, the rock as possible.

The first step to this is commitment.
You have to be willing to remove your rock from the tank.
It doesn't have to be all at once, but I feel if you are going to do this do it all. In stages if that is easier but make sure that all of it gets done.

The new environment you are creating for your rock is to take it from an algal driven to a bacterial driven system.
In order to this, the rock needs to be in total darkness to retard and eventually kill the algae's on the rock and to give the bacteria time to do the job.

So basically you need tubs to hold the rock.

Equipment needed.
1. Dedication.
2. Tubs to cook rock in. And an equal amount of tubs to hold the rock during waterchanges.
3. A few powerheads.
4. Plenty of buckets.
5. A smug feeling of superiority that you are taking it to "the next level."

Here are the steps, if you have any questions I will try my best to answer them. What I don't know I am sure Bomber can/will instruct.

1. Get into your head and accept the fact you will be making lots of salt water if you aren't lucky enough to have access to filtered NSW.
2. Explain to significant other what is going on so they don't flip out. This process can take up to 2 months. Prepare them in advance so he/she can mark it on the calendar and that they won't nag about it until that date arrives.
3. Setup a tub(s) where the rock is to be cooked. Garages are great for this.
4. Make up enough water to fill tub(s) about halfway and around 5-7 buckets about 60% full.
5. Remove all the rock you want to cook at this stage. (The rock can be removed piece by piece until you are done.) I suggest shutting off the circulation beforehand to minimize dust storms.
6. Take the first piece of rock and dunk it, swish it, very, very well in the first bucket. Then do it again in the 2nd bucket, then the third.
7. Place rock in the tub.
8. Repeat steps 6 & 7 to every piece of rock you want to cook at this time. The reason I suggested 5-7 buckets of water will be evident quickly...as the water quickly turnsq brown.
9. Place powerhead(s) in the tub and plug in. Position at least one powerhead so that it agitates the surface of the water pretty well. This is to keep the water oxygenated. You can use an air pump for additional oxygenation if you wish.
9. Cover the tub. Remember, we want total darkness.
10. Empty out buckets, restart circulation on main tank.
11. Wait.
12. During the first couple of weeks it is recommended to do a swishing and dunking of the rocks twice a week.
What this entails is to make up enough water to fill up those buckets and the tub the rock is in.
First, lay out your empty tub(s) and fill buckets the same as before.
Then, uncover tub with the rock in it. Take a rock and swish it in the tub it's in to knock any easy to get off junk.
Then, swish it thru the 3 buckets again, and place in the empty tub..
Repeat for all your rocks.
Then empty the tub that all the rocks were cooking in, take it outside and rinse it out with a hose.
Place tub back where it was, fill with new saltwater, add rocks and powerheads, and cover.
Wait again unti the next water change.
You will be utterly amazed at how much sand, silt, detrius is at the bottom of the tub and every bucket. It is amazing.

How it works:


Some FAQ's.
When re-introducing the rock to my tank, a month or two from now, should I do that in parts to help minimize any cycling effect(s)...if there are any?
I never have. Really after a very short while, the ammonium cycle has been extablished. That's not what you're worry about though, it's the stored phosphates and that you have to wait it out.
When they are producing very little detritus - you'll know - then I would use them all at once.

Would running Carbon filtration and/or a PO4 reducing media help/hurry/hinder the process?
I wouldn't fool with it. You don't want the detritus to sit there long enough to rot, release water soluble P again. You want to take it out while it's still locked up in that bacterial detritus.




I hope this helps you out.
It really is a "miracle" and a low cost one at that.
The only monies spent are for salt and electricity for the powerheads which are nominal. Especially to rid yourself of Bryopsis.
Time and effort is all it akes. And really not that much effort.
I would say that 85% of my exposed rock had Bryopsis (hair algae) covering it.
There isn't a single visible strand on andy rocks in the tubs now.
Remember, the key is patience. Let this process run its course.

And a few last minute tidbits I remembered.
Your coralline will die back, receed etc.
My thoughts on this are GREAT!
Now my rock is more porous for additional pods, mysids, worms etc.
Coralline will grow back.
Throughout this process the sponges, and pods on my rock have not died off.
Everytime I do a waterchange they are there and plentiful.

If you have any questions please ask.
 

WXB

New member
the only question I am thinking of is what to do about the rock with coral on it? I did this once and every worm died off. The light doesnt the rock Need light? I ued less light but i gave it light. I did 2 days no light then one day light. why no light?
 

SkullV

They Got My Number
No light so 100% of the algae dies. If your coral is not encrusted onto the rock I would cut the plugs off the rock and keep them in a frag rack. The more I think about this the more I think your rock is probably not the issue though (although cooking it cant hurt). If you did not notice a huge drop in nitrates after a 70% water change your issue is in your water, salt, or test kit.
 
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