Condylactis Gigantea

caneelbay89

New member
What a difference good lighting, flow and water make. Amazing!

At the LFS there was, what she was told, a small GBTA being sucked into the intake. (Pretty sure it moved itself there for optimal flow.) My daughter felt sorry for it as the kid in the dept made no attempt to move it or check on it when it was brought to his attention.It was hurting. So of course she bought it. It was floating in a small deli like container.

Granted, it is very rewarding to have a 12 year take an interest in your hobby. Then again, we were not ready for an anemone. (New rule: No purchases for tanks without parents permission.) We call it new rule because we had never told her she couldn't put something in the tank. Who knew?

Going on our second week now and it probably wouldn't fit in the tall deli container. This, Condy Gigantea, is huge. Apparently, it was starving as it ate two small silver sides yesterday.

Wish I had taken a before shot (it was sad).

Does it look healthy to you? Is it bleached or is that normal. (Lights were so poor at LFS) It has improved so much. Returning is not an option with this LFS for any saltwater stock.

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cschweitzer

New member
First off, never shop at a place that does not have returns. They are just watching their *** because they have not trained their employees well enough to give you correct information. This is a horrible policy, especially when you get something because someone said it was good for your tank and then it eats something of yours. That anemone is bleached, pretty badly at that. With proper conditions, it can be saved. It's hard for newbies(no offense meant whatsoever) to keep anems, which is why it is not recommended.

Can't really tell, but it does look like a BTA. Condylactis gigantea anemones are atlantic waters and not ideal hosting for clowns. The gigantea normally found for clownfish hosting is a Stichodactyla genus, is a carpet anem, and is not what that is. If it is truely a GBTA, then it is Echinodermata quadricolor. Just for reference if your trying to gain info.
 

caneelbay89

New member
Appreciate the input. I will research further given the information provided. Will continue to do my best (newbie is accurate, not considered a slam) to preserve this specimen.

The more I learn, the more I am aware of how little I know.

Thank you, again.
 

cschweitzer

New member
That's the same way I feel the third year into this adventure/addiction/etc. The more you learn, the more you want to learn. The more you want to learn, the more you realize you know nothing. The more you realize you know nothing, the more you realize that most of the people are in the exact same boat. This whole reefkeeping this is a relatively new hobby...yes, it's been around for over forty-some years. But most of the reefkeeping back then was done on the ocean, done improperly(or at least by today's standards), and as many of the veterans will tell you, was in many instances just a death tank. Most things brought into a system had no real knowledge base to look things up like we do today, many times had not been attempted before, and many times would be incorrectly managed. We are fortunate in the fact that there are many great sources out there for us to read up on, but it is a Catch 22. Lots of great information, but for every correct statement, there are about 20 people giving you bad information. Lots of popular opinions, but many of which are wrong. Many ideas of what works best, but that is what works best for that person, not everyone else. When you read a piece of information, collaborate it with at least two other sources that have not used the exact same source and wording for their material as the original. Once you read up on it, then come here and ask for input from the people who have read the exact same article, attempted it, and have had success/failures using it. Be prepared to weed through pages of knowledge to find the two good sources and in turn the answer to your question.
 

cschweitzer

New member
Oh crap!! My bad. I am horrible at spelling and remembering the exact prunuciation to spell all those things out. I have over 40 species of corals, 6 species of fish, 20 species of different inverts like crabs, snails, stars, stromapod, etc. On any given day, I will remember about half of their names by heart. Other days, I'll look it up and still not get the right answer...goes to show what kind of stupid stuff you'll come up with looking to search google quickly.

In other words, yes, entacmaea is the correct genus...:)
 

caneelbay89

New member
I again appreciate your response. Also, I completely agree with you regarding source material and experienced opinions being the best method of determining action.

My next big read will be counteracting bleaching.

Thank you!
 

cschweitzer

New member
Meaty foods...squid, shrimp, scallops, clams, oysters. Chopped up, blended, or grated(freeze than use a cheese grater...easiest method I've found). Add Selcon for omega-3 fatty acids and garlic extreme to promote color, immune building, etc. Mysis shrimp are good also. Brine shrimp add no nutritional value unless they are either gut-loaded(brand will specify) or babybrine, which are a little small for an anem.
 
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