Does this sound like good advice from a LFS?

jcard71

New member
Hi,

I currently own a 46 gallon bow with African Cichlids and I'm contemplating buying at least a 72 gallon bow for SW coral tank.

I e-mail this person regarding my interest and this is what he replied back to me with. Anyway, I was wondering if you experienced hobbyist think it sounds like good advice.

THANKS!



"If a 4 foot wide tank is as large as you can go I’d stick with the 72g vs the 92 corner. This is because corner tanks are more difficult given we want good water flow all around our rock structure. Any obtrustructions (like built-in overflows) or deep corners create obstacles to flow allowing for dead spots/dirt collection areas.



In a reef system filtration = the sand & rock in our tanks. This is where 90% of the bacteria resides. The rest is water movement. Understanding that the core to any “filter” is beneficial bacteria present breaking down wastes produced. In a Fluval or any other “mechanical” filter the media inside the unit houses beneficial bacteria & as the water passes through the media the bacteria breaks down the wastes. The term “live rock” or “live sand” comes from these beneficial bacteria residing there (as well as any other microbes & live things which just add to the diversity of the term “live”). We employ an “overflow” system based on a wet/dry but we do not use bio balls (which were used to harbor additional bacteria) or any other filter media like sponges etc. Today the sump or what was known as the wet/dry area is really just a “water collection/conditioning” area where we have our heater, skimmer & main pump which returns the water to the main tank. This sump area also acts as a “refugium” or place of refuge. Meaning there are no fish to eat the microganisms that spawn & procreate in there. Because beautiful fish like Mandarins prefer only live foods they rely on our system’s ability to generate them. The sumps also allow for other marine organisms to procreate. In some cases we’ve had creatures like cucumbers spawn & we’ve plucked baby ones out from the sump! So awesome"
 

outy

New member
his science is rite but dont let him tell you what tank to get, there he gets a little full of @@#$
 

jcard71

New member
Heres some more from that e-mail...please tell me what you think?
Again, thank you!



"You will be amazed at how easy & effective these systems are. Easier than freshwater! We don’t deal with PH up & down, we don’t vacuum the sand. If set up properly you just feed your fish once a day, scrape the viewing glass when needed (maybe once a week) and do 10% weekly water changes which can be done in 5 minutes if set up right."
 

yoboyjdizz

New member
Its good information, but if i were you i would go with a standard 75 or 90 would be easier to aquascape and probably lighter on the wallet. As far as it being easier then freshwater thats misleading there is way more effort and time put into saltwater tanks to keep them up to par.. good luck!
 

puffer21

New member
<img src="/images/welcome.gif" width="500" height="62"><br><b><i><big><big>To Reef Central</b></i></big></big>

and also saltwater is not easier you have to test the water and make it more percise than freashwater. Plus a bunch of other stuff
 

Sk8r

Staff member
RC Mod
The last is true.

I have a 52 corner bow, and it has some conveniences---some negatives, too: let's start with those.
There are no wedge sumps, not pre-made. You're stuck with one smaller than you'd like. The underneath space sucks.
It's harder to focus a camera.
Bowfront glass is harder to clean than straight glass. It can be done.
You need a stepstool to get in and work on your coral placements. And you can never see into the downflow without major gymnastics.b

The positives are mostly, actually, in the flow department: that curved front acts as a backstop that bounces flow in all directions. I mounted a Sea Swirl [against the company's advice] on the front wall of my downflow, and the flow sweeps the whole arc, bouncing back under the rockwork. I arranged a massive rockwork and the centerpiece is a wide-mouthed cave that lets my fish tootle about in full view but with the notion that they're being sheltered. The 'roof' of the cave is actually supported by stalagmites of Tongan Branch coral, and it gives me a near-light place to display corals and the like.
The other bennie? It looks real neat in the living room and takes up very little space: I put the stand for a 80 gal right next to it, and that acts as cat furniture, video cabinet and autotopoff cabinet, plus holding the ballasts.
 

jcard71

New member
I like the look of the BOW for sure over the standard tanks.

What do you think's a good price for a 72 gallon bow with stand?
 

Sk8r

Staff member
RC Mod
Depends on glass thickness. Half-inch glass can range up to 800.00 predrilled and takes two big guys to get from truck to stand.
 

RichConley

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=8082892#post8082892 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by puffer21


and also saltwater is not easier you have to test the water and make it more percise than freashwater. Plus a bunch of other stuff


I dunno, i wouldnt say my SPS reef is any harder to keep than my planted cichlid tank was.


You have to rememebr, we've got much better methods of nutrient removal(skimmers) than the freshies have (water changes)
 

Amphiprion

Premium Member
My planted tank is, by far, more difficult to care for than my reef. Then again, I planned it that way by blasting it with light, so it all depends upon how the freshwater tank is set up. Water changes are easier with a 'python' style faucet pump, so I guess that is one plus, seeing as how I do at least 50% a week (which is fine for me). I also add lots of fertilizers daily (and that includes balancing them out initially, which is more difficult than a reef, IME), feed daily, scrape the glass infrequently, and trim plants weekly (to keep the lower leaves from dying back). With my reef, I add kalkwasser for top off, clean/empty the protein skimmer, scrape glass (rarely), and frag corals to prevent competition (often).
 

jessp

New member
seems like good advice to me particularly because he is keeping it simple and not overwhelming you with science. I don't know about others but after having my tank running for some time, i can tell what is neccessary by the way the tank (particularly corals)look. Initially there will be lots of testing, but in the long run if your tank is running successfully you will start to know whats needed.
 

UrbanSage

New member
Good advice from a LFS.... what is the world comming to :D
Sounds like you're in good hands :) and welcome to reefcentral!
 

raynist

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=8082880#post8082880 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by yoboyjdizz
Its good information, but if i were you i would go with a standard 75 or 90 would be easier to aquascape and probably lighter on the wallet. As far as it being easier then freshwater thats misleading there is way more effort and time put into saltwater tanks to keep them up to par.. good luck!

I agree. 75 or 90 for a 4ft tank.

A 120 is also a 4ft tank (4x2x2).

--ray
 

theatrus

100-mile-commuter
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=8083266#post8083266 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by Amphiprion
My planted tank is, by far, more difficult to care for than my reef. Then again, I planned it that way by blasting it with light, so it all depends upon how the freshwater tank is set up. Water changes are easier with a 'python' style faucet pump, so I guess that is one plus, seeing as how I do at least 50% a week (which is fine for me). I also add lots of fertilizers daily (and that includes balancing them out initially, which is more difficult than a reef, IME), feed daily, scrape the glass infrequently, and trim plants weekly (to keep the lower leaves from dying back). With my reef, I add kalkwasser for top off, clean/empty the protein skimmer, scrape glass (rarely), and frag corals to prevent competition (often).

You've just so described my experiences :) I've taken to growing mostly java ferns and anachris now... I like low maintenance.

I tend to fuss over the reef tank more now... but in the end its just goofing off fixing things which really weren't broken and didn't need fixing :) If I do get busy, there really isn't too much that I have to do.
 

Amphiprion

Premium Member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=8083790#post8083790 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by theatrus
You've just so described my experiences :) I've taken to growing mostly java ferns and anachris now... I like low maintenance.

I tend to fuss over the reef tank more now... but in the end its just goofing off fixing things which really weren't broken and didn't need fixing :) If I do get busy, there really isn't too much that I have to do.

LOL. Sounds just like me. I actually started freshwater after I set up my marine tanks and that is where I got 'the more light the better' idea from :rolleyes: , which doesn't work all that well (at least if you aren't prepared for it).
 

michaeldaly

New member
I agree with jssp, once the tak has been setup a while you learn to reconize how your tak looks when healthy and only if something is looking bad do you have to test.
 

IndyReefMan

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=8083785#post8083785 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by roons
i wouldnt get a bow, straight tank

I agree. I have a 72 gal bowfront right now and I really do like the look of the front... very contemporary. But, if I had it to do all over again I would get a rectangular tank. The 72 is too difficult to aquascape. There just isn't enough width (front to back) to work with on the ends. It makes it hard to place rock at the base so that your rock structure is high enough for your more light demanding SPS.
 
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