Drilled my first Aquarium

trjosu

New member
I drilled my first aquarium tonight on a sump refugium project I'm doing for my 120. I ordered the bit from Richon tools. It cost me less than $10 with shipping and got here in right at a week. It took less than 30 seconds to drill the hole on a 15 high tank and everything was perfect. No glass is safe from me now!! I'll do a small write up on the project when I get it done if anybody is interested. Also thanks to Aquariums in Edmond for setting me up with Bulkheads today.
 
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jesusbrito

New member
Hi, How did you do this? did you drilled a bunch of holes to make a big one or did you get a bit that made a big hole all at once?

Thank you
 

trjosu

New member
I bought a 45mm diamond holesaw from Richon tools so one hole. It cut like butter. I've read these bits won't do as many holes as the expensive american bits but for less than 10 bucks it did a great job for the hole I needed.
 

jesusbrito

New member
Do you mind tellig me what part number? the 45mm I found goes fro 29.00 or posting the link to the bit

Thanks for sharing the info
 

jprince58

Premium Member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10456127#post10456127 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by trjosu
http://www.richontools.com/catalog/i174.html
Thats the one I used. I think they have a pro model or something with better vent holes to keep the bit cooler but this one worked fine.

The diamond saws are made using two different processes. The less expensive saws have the diamonds electroplated onto the steel base. In the other, more expensive process, the diamonds are actually bonded to the steel base using a "sintering" process. This produces a higher quality, longer lasting saw. Since the electroplating wears quickly, the diamonds slough off during the sawing process and results in a much shorter useful life (i.e. fewer holes) of the saw. Additionally, as the saw wears, the quality of the cut will decrease. It sounds like the more expensive saws might actually be the way to go, but for most of us who will only cut a few holes, the cheaper ones will generally do the job quite nicely.
 

trjosu

New member
Exactly, I needed it for this project and to drill the 25 gallon project I'm getting ready to start. Everything I read said these bits are good for around 12 holes so I figured it to be the best way to go for me.
 

Little Bitty

New member
I am happy to hear your first try went so great! I am hoping to make my first attempt at it soon. Did you use a cordless drill? I have read starting the hole at an angle to avoid the bit from "skating" on the glass. Did you use this method?
 

trjosu

New member
Yes, I used an 18volt cordless on the lower speed. If I was doing a display tank I would have spent the money on a drill guide, however starting it at an angle did minimize the skating.
 

Little Bitty

New member
If you are enjoying the drilling so much and feel like you "need a fix" ( i.e. another tank to drill) I am looking for help in drilling an 80 gallon. lol
 
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