Dry rock

Bremenguppie

New member
So I have a 75 gallon tank with about 30 lbs of live rock in an established tank. But I'm pretty sure I should have closer to 75 lbs of live rock to help keep good bacteria going. But live rock is expensive. If I was to put regular larger dry rocks in there. I know they would eventually turn into live rock. But is there some dry rock that works better than others or could I put in pretty much whatever I find.
 

tidewater

I’ll get there one day
Yes you can add dry rock to the tank. It will eventually become live rock. It will take some time and you may notice some algae along the way. Make sure you clean the rock prior to adding it to the tank. A little digging here and I’m sure you will find a method that best fits your skill/comfort level.
 

Sk8r

Staff member
RC Mod
Larger rock is not necessarily good rock. You want a lot of holes, porosity, and shapes. Piled little rock is good. Lot of nooks and crannies. You also want rock that is good with salt water, which generally means some variety of limestone. Volcanic rock is not good because of the metal content, and if our land up here in the PNW is any indication, an acidic tendency, when what you want is alkaline. We have ^^^^up there a very long thread on preparing rock, and the best stuff is probably the initial post and those immediately following, because crazy happens on the way down a thread, not universally, but often.
 

Member No. 1

Ver. 2.1.1
Premium Member
The old rule 1lb of rock per gallon isn't the norm anymore. Some are using less than 50% rock/gal. It all depends on your stocking load, feeding frequency, water change schedule.
Do you have any indication you don't have enough rock? After feeding, wait a little bit, see if you have any detectable ammonia, if yes, does it deplete rapidly. Also check for nitrites not nitrates. If you see a spike in those that could also be a good indication you need more rock.

So how heavy is your bio load, how often and how much do you feed, and how often and how much do you do water changes.

If you're still concerned, you could always add dry rubble rock of bio spheres/boxes to your sump.
 

Bremenguppie

New member
Member 1 no I don't have any indication of issues with ammonia,nitrites or anything. I feed once a day and do a water change usually once a week. It was more of a combination of the old theory of 1 pound for a gallon and for looks. I don't have a lot rock for a 75 gal tank. Was looking to add some more to give more places for fish and critters to hide and just give it a little more filler look.
 

Member No. 1

Ver. 2.1.1
Premium Member
Member 1 no I don't have any indication of issues with ammonia,nitrites or anything. I feed once a day and do a water change usually once a week. It was more of a combination of the old theory of 1 pound for a gallon and for looks. I don't have a lot rock for a 75 gal tank. Was looking to add some more to give more places for fish and critters to hide and just give it a little more filler look.

What thru me is that you said you thought you "needed" to be closer to the outdated 1lb/gal rule. If you're only adding it for aesthetic reasons, then add just what you need until you think it looks nice. I might have 50-60lbs in a 120. I like the minimal look, plus lots of swimming room.
 

Bremenguppie

New member
Originally I wasn't sure if I needed the 1pd per gallon. I was most concerned about making sure I had enough rock in the growing to provide the crabs and things stuff go eat and help balance the tank. But since the old rule doesn't apply anymore. I may just add about another 15 to 20 lbs rock and call it a project
 

Dmorty217

Saltwater Addict
There are plenty of options besides rock to boost biological capacity. Siporax is the best product, the largest MM size.. they label it as pond
 
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