Ever Consider Using SCUBA Rebreather CO2 Scrubber For Aquarium Use?

szhttm

New member
Hello,

Living down here in South Florida only allows few opportunities to open the windows to let fresh air in to circulate throughout the house and remove some of the exhausted air. It’s just too hot most of the time do we just keep the air conditioner running all the time.

The few times I am able to do this, I do see the PH in my aquarium raise throughout the day when the windows are open.

I was wondering if anyone has ever thought about incorporating a CO2 scrubber (like the ones used in SCUBA Rebreathers) to filter out the CO2 before the air goes into a skimmer.

Has anyone ever thought about this as an option for an aquarium? If so, has anyone ever tried to add a CO2 scrubber to their aquarium system?

Thank you!!!

Good Luck And Have Fun!!!;
:thumbsup:
 

TAB

New member
Are you sure its cuased by the CO2? Anyways, a simple degassing tower would be alot cheaper and work better. Remember rebreathers put off deadly gases when they get wet( the inside that is)
 

szhttm

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=14818557#post14818557 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by TAB
Are you sure its cuased by the CO2? Anyways, a simple degassing tower would be alot cheaper and work better. Remember rebreathers put off deadly gases when they get wet( the inside that is)

Yes, I am sure it is CO2 because I also notice my PH drop when I have other people visiting us in the house.

What kind of degassing tower are you suggesting?

Thank you!!!


Good Luck And Have Fun!!!;
:thumbsup:
 

TAB

New member
There are several of them on the market( mainly large) basicly you have water falling inside of a open tube, that you pump fresh air into.

now that I think about it, they are basicly a skimmer, you just would use fresh air.
 

szhttm

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=14818715#post14818715 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by TAB
There are several of them on the market( mainly large) basicly you have water falling inside of a open tube, that you pump fresh air into.

now that I think about it, they are basicly a skimmer, you just would use fresh air.

I do have a skimmer on my system already (an AquaC 400). What I don't have is the ability to bring in fresh air due to were the aquarium is setup.

That is why I was asking about adding a CO2 scrubber to the skimmer as a possible alternative.

Thank you!!!


Good Luck And Have Fun!!!;
:thumbsup:
 

DB06

Premium Member
I have used LAR V's (rebreather). The CO2 is removed through the use of a cannister of sodium hydroxide (Sofnolime). The carbon dioxide (gas) reacts with sodium hydroxide and calcium hydroxide to form calcium carbonate (solid).

Interesting note, on the canisters of soda sorb (our name for it), it clearly stated hazardous (caustic, do not breath dust, don't expose to skin/eyes, etc). Ocassionly, a diver would get a caustic cocktail from an inproperly assembled dive rig.

And, it is expensive (dive/medical grade). That aside, I do not think it a viable alternative to fresh air, or perhaps lime - if you want to raise pH.
 

szhttm

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=14819943#post14819943 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by Rhodophyta
Fast growing plants and a lighting system for them would also scrub some of the CO2 from the interior air.

There are also air exchangers that bring in outside air and expell polluted over-humid interior air, but conserve either heat or air conditioning depending on the climate/season. Here is an example: http://www.alpinehomeair.com/viewproduct.cfm?productID=206

I like the air exchanger suggestion. I will have to look into this more.

Thank you!!!


Good Luck And Have Fun!!!;
:thumbsup:
 

hllywd

Premier World Traveler
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=14820447#post14820447 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by Tang Salad
You could run your skimmer airline to the outside.

I have to agree with theredben, Tang Salad's idea would cost a few dollars with little follow up maintenance. The scrubber is going to be expensive initially and over time.

Tim
 

Rhodophyta

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=14823621#post14823621 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by bristle
Don't forget plants respire at night, adding more CO2.
This one is an Urban Myth. During dark periods plants use stored energy collected during the day to convert CO2 into sugars. So most plants absorb CO2 around the clock. The exceptions include plants like cactus, bromeliads, and orchids. Totally contrary to the U. Myth, these plants only absorb CO2 at night when it is cooler, resulting in an energy savings. Enough CO2 is stored as malic acid to be used during the day.
 

bristle

New member
Their stomates may be open to use gas exchange for CO2 for sugar synthesis, but they still respire and produce CO2.
 

Rhodophyta

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=14827919#post14827919 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by bristle
Their stomates may be open to use gas exchange for CO2 for sugar synthesis, but they still respire and produce CO2.
Both animals and plants respire day and night, but plants do not move, so their respiration rate is miniscule. The term I have heard a botanist use is "next to nothing". Plants absorb much more CO2 from the air than what they can respire, so do the math. Subtract next to nothing and you still have almost exactly the same amount of absorbed CO2.
 
Top