Feeding Corals

Surfside74

New member
Hey everyone,

I know what I am about to ask is going to spark debate but I am looking for some help concerning my corals. I have a 60 gallon mixed reef tank running under Radion Gen2. I have been feeding the following:

PE Mysis/Cyclopeeze daily for the fish (My next batch I am going to wash under RO water before putting into tank)
Reef Nutrition Roti Feast every 3rd day (3-4 drops)
Phycopure Reef Blend by Algagen every 3rd day (5-10ml)
I also have Ocean's Blend Coral Vibrance but have only used it once.

I do ten gallon a week water change and all parameters are stable. I do have phosphates and some green/brown algae with my parameters at .04-.08 ppm Po4. I have GFO reactor coming this week and Carbon reactor as well. Currently running Phosguard in sump but not pulling everything out (PO4), so its time to switch. My question is, besides what I feed the fish, do I need to add the other stuff. I am looking to simplify everything and only put into the tank what is needed. I appreciate any help you guys and girls can give. Thanks.

Rob
 

QPWithCheeseQP

New member
I would cut back on feeding a bit maybe 4 times a week instead of every day. You could hook a desk light up to your sump and add cheato to cut down PO4 it can even be sold or used to feed some fish :D its a win win.
 

coralsnaked

New member
Hummm ! Besides feeding your fish for the natural fertilizer, your corals only need natural tank foods, as basically in the wild coral feed on bacteria and plankton algae on a regular basis (daily). This is why I like diatomic algae on my glass. Clean my glass twice a week and feed my corals. Besides that once a week I blast the rock and top layer of substrate and feed my coral bacteria. Only other thing I do is feed coral frenzy twice a week which means my coral are fed 5X weekly. Feeding LPS Mysis was fun for a while but is tedious in the larger tanks and not really needed.
 

GreshamH

New member
Hummm ! Besides feeding your fish for the natural fertilizer, your corals only need natural tank foods, as basically in the wild coral feed on bacteria and plankton algae on a regular basis (daily). This is why I like diatomic algae on my glass. Clean my glass twice a week and feed my corals. Besides that once a week I blast the rock and top layer of substrate and feed my coral bacteria. Only other thing I do is feed coral frenzy twice a week which means my coral are fed 5X weekly. Feeding LPS Mysis was fun for a while but is tedious in the larger tanks and not really needed.

Corals feed on many things in the wild, I'd do a little more reading on the subject before stating that as a fact :). That said, very few feed upon "plankton algae" (phytoplankton is the true name) but most do feed on zooplankton, bacterioplankton and picoplankton. Most hobbyists don't have nearly enough zooplankton/picplankton/phytoplankton in their tanks to support the amount of which corals naturally consume of them.
 

QPWithCheeseQP

New member
Corals feed on many things in the wild, I'd do a little more reading on the subject before stating that as a fact :). That said, very few feed upon "plankton algae" (phytoplankton is the true name) but most do feed on zooplankton, bacterioplankton and picoplankton. Most hobbyists don't have nearly enough zooplankton/picplankton/phytoplankton in their tanks to support the amount of which corals naturally consume of them.

Is there anyway to safely increase the amount of plankton in a home aquarium?
 

Reef Frog

New member
Feeding many LPS meaty foods contributes to growth, polyp extension & color for sure IME. Personally I wouldn't go food less in a low nutrient tank with LPS. I think Mother Nature (evolution) gave them mouths for a reason. It's fun and no big deal IMO.

I always thought the "fish poo is all ya need" idea applied to SPS corals & zoas.
 

penfold2

Member
Is there anyway to safely increase the amount of plankton in a home aquarium?

Zooplankton production typically depends on the continual presence of phytoplankton or other food sources, and the absence of filtration methods that would remove plankton (like protein skimming). This can easily be accomplished in external culture vessels, but does not work well in a reef tank. So people who want plankton usually add an artificial source (dried, frozen, or refrigerated), allow the corals to feed, and then quickly remove the excess with the tanks filtration. Corals can be spot fed to maximize feeding while minimizing pollution. For LPS though, I don't feed anything smaller than cyclop-eeze (~800 microns).
 
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