Filtering a hospital tank

frogdog

Relentless Question-Asker
I've read that it can be useful to keep a sponge or small filter (like would fit in a mechanical filter) in the sump, so it has bacteria on it if you need to set up a Qtank or hospital tank. But if you're moving a sick fish from the DT to a hospital tank and set up a mechanical power filter, wouldn't that sponge bring some of the microbes with it that you're trying to get rid of, into the hospital tank?
 

Deinonych

New member
That is correct. In that case, using a bacteria-in-a-bottle product like Biospira works well in a pinch. Just make sure you use some sort of media for the bacteria to populate. I use Seachem Matrix in a media bag in my HOB filter. Works very well, and I've never had ammonia problems using it.
 

snorvich

Team RC member
Team RC
That is correct. In that case, using a bacteria-in-a-bottle product like Biospira works well in a pinch. Just make sure you use some sort of media for the bacteria to populate. I use Seachem Matrix in a media bag in my HOB filter. Works very well, and I've never had ammonia problems using it.

I agree. If you have meticulously maintained a parasite free display tank, keeping sponges in the sump to seed them with beneficial bacteria is a great idea. In a pinch, bacteria-in-a-bottle products could be used if you are establishing a hospital tank "under duress". If your normal quarantine protocol is tank transfer to eliminate cryptocaryon irritans, then ammonia reduction products will be effective. (Remember never to use those if you are doing chemical treatment with a copper product). If you do prazipro for fluke elimination during the tank transfer process, then you will have eliminated the two most prevalent parasites while not requiring permanent biological filtration.
 

frogdog

Relentless Question-Asker
I agree. If you have meticulously maintained a parasite free display tank, keeping sponges in the sump to seed them with beneficial bacteria is a great idea.

It seems clear from my reading--including your blog--that ich and velvet will not survive if the display tank is left fallow for a while, but are there other pathogens that once introduced to a display tank can never be totally eradicated?
 
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