Fish ID anyone?

sytanek

New member
fish.jpg


I do not have one of these, but have seen these before and was interested.


Thanks!
 

Samala

New member
Maybe the Bandtail puffer, Sphoeroides spengleri? They are very common in the seagrass flats off of Florida.

>Sarah
 

sytanek

New member
Thanks for the input Sarah, that was the other species I was considering, but could not find a really good picture of one.
 

sytanek

New member
Awesome I found it, Looks like the little guy is pretty toxic...good thing I didn't really handle him, just dropped him back out of the net.
 

seth16

New member
wow, how many of those do you have?lol.....are they reef safe? probably not, most all puffers are not, but HEY!, maybe htis one may not be "not" reef safe...
 

Samala

New member
As far as I know the toxicity comes from ingesting the flesh from these guys, its probably related to the tetrodotoxins the other puffer fish have. I really hope its not possible to contract any of the toxin from handling it. Otherwise, I should be a goner. :p

On a related note, some reports of toxicity from pufferfish has been traced back to saxitoxin, which is actually derived from marine dinoflagellates. And there is a growing body of evidence that shows that tetrodotoxin isnt actually produced by the fish, but actually comes from several different genus of bacteria. Crazy web of trophic interactions in the watery realm.

>Sarah
 

sytanek

New member
lol, well thanks for clearing that up!!

I wonder if anyone has ever tried to keep one of these. It seems they don't get very big.
 

cowboyswife

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=9813074#post9813074 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by Samala
As far as I know the toxicity comes from ingesting the flesh from these guys, its probably related to the tetrodotoxins the other puffer fish have. I really hope its not possible to contract any of the toxin from handling it. Otherwise, I should be a goner. :p

On a related note, some reports of toxicity from pufferfish has been traced back to saxitoxin, which is actually derived from marine dinoflagellates. And there is a growing body of evidence that shows that tetrodotoxin isnt actually produced by the fish, but actually comes from several different genus of bacteria. Crazy web of trophic interactions in the watery realm.

>Sarah

I wish I knew half of what you do!
 
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