Gfo

Randy Holmes-Farley

Reef Chemist
Premium Member
I have tried them all and Rowa is a fine product. It removes the most PO4 in the least amount of time. Many reefers I know accross the country agree as well. Whats your favorite?

I've not seen any data to support claims that one hobby brand is better than another, and I'd have to say I am quite skeptical of the claim that Rowaphos is either demonstrably "faster" or that it is preferred by more people than other brands
 

LISound

New member
I know for a fact that the HC GFO works very well. :)
And you can get it at a decent price compared to some other name Brands...:thumbsup:
 

JPags

New member
I used the High Capacity GFO and still had high phosphates (Maybe they were too high for these types of media), it was around 0.18.

I ended up using a BlueVet Phosphate control. It knocked my phosphates down to below 0.03 and now I am just keeping an eye on them.

I have stopped using GFO for now and I am watching my RO water for phosphates when i make it.

John
 

EdSnyder

New member
I used the regular stuff from BRS. It has helped greatly to get the algae under control. However it did drop my ALK. I brought it back up. I am just wondering if I am going to have to keep watching my AlK?
 

Dejavu

ReefKeeping Mag staff
Team RC
GFO will precipitate calcium carbonate, which will lower alk. To avoid this slowly increase flow though your reactor when first adding new GFO.
 

EdSnyder

New member
GFO will precipitate calcium carbonate, which will lower alk. To avoid this slowly increase flow though your reactor when first adding new GFO.

I did not go very slowly. So you are saying now my alk should be ok, or will this continue to be a problem?
 

PowermanKW

New member
I've not seen any data to support claims that one hobby brand is better than another, and I'd have to say I am quite skeptical of the claim that Rowaphos is either demonstrably "faster" or that it is preferred by more people than other brands

Is there any data that shows HC GFO does indeed have a higher capacity. You use half the amount. does it have twice the capacity?

Also, does GFO remove all PO4 and then reach capacity, or does it remove slowly over time? I'm trying to ask if it is like a DI filter. You get a pretty distinct line of what is exhausted, then it breaks though. Is GFO like that?

My point is that I am going to use smaller amounts and change more frequently than just letting it sit for 2 months. Any problem with that?
 

Randy Holmes-Farley

Reef Chemist
Premium Member
Is there any data that shows HC GFO does indeed have a higher capacity. You use half the amount. does it have twice the capacity?

It might, but I've not seen the data to support it.

Also, does GFO remove all PO4 and then reach capacity, or does it remove slowly over time? I'm trying to ask if it is like a DI filter. You get a pretty distinct line of what is exhausted, then it breaks though. Is GFO like that?

Not exactly.

GFO binds phosphate in relation to the amount in the water. At 1 ppm it will bind more than at 0.1 ppm, which binds more than at 0.01 ppm. The binding is a reversible equilibrium.

But, at 1 ppm you may saturate all binding sites in only a few hours or less, while at very low concentrations it may take a long time to saturate the GFO.

Smaller amounts changed more frequently sounds fine.
 

tawolcott

Member
It was my understanding that all GFO comes from the same source and is rebranded. Was a German company but I thought one of the big conglomerates bought them out.
 

reefkeeperaxm

In Memoriam
I used high capacity for a while and recently switched back to regular, seems like both do the job for me, keeps phosphates at untraceable levels.
 

luther1200

Premium Member
I have tried pretty much all the popular brands. And I saw a vast improvement after I started using the HC. IME it is dramatically better than even ROWAphos, which I was never personally impressed with. Not to mention the BRS HC is way cheaper than ROWA.
 
Top