Large Seriatoporia bleaching???

o.c.d.

New member
This coral was grown from a small fragment and within 30 hrs this is what happened I'm not sure why? I did pull a pest anemone Thalassianthus aster, I tore the tissue of it and fluid leaked out into the tank. I don't know if they are toxic. That is the onlt thing I can think of the tank is stable otherwise. My next question would be what are the little oblong specs snail crap ?
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noahm

New member
they look like a type of pod that I have seen. Can't remember the neme, but they basically have legs fanning out around them and when taken out of the water on a rock or something they look like those specs. Can't tell from the pic, but thats what the specs look like to me. Not a pest though, maybe just feeding on dead tissue.

Thats my guess as to the specks, but no clue on the coral die off.
 

rendogg

New member
That same thing happened to a very large colony that I had being stung by some aiptasia, it seems to start a chain reaction. I fragged the heck out of it and managed to salvage a fair amount. I doubt the specks have anything to do with it, probably just opportunistic feeders.
 

luther1200

Premium Member
Maybe flatworms? Kinda hard to tell from the pics. They could be AEFW, or they could just be regular ones that moved in once the coral died. But I can't really tell for sure if they are even flatworms.
 

o.c.d.

New member
It looks the same underwater as out of water, just like the pic. The thing that I don't understand is it's been in the same spot for years not aiptasia around my copperband is a fierce hunter. Nothing has really changed.Hmm. I'm pretty good at I.D.ing things I have over 100 books to help. I've never came across what is in the pics. Thanks all for trying to help
 

Maivortex

New member
Looks like RTN (rapid tissue necrosis) . RTN is prolly the only thing that could destroy that much of a coral in 30 hrs. If you can get chlormaphenicol, Quarantine the coral in a separate tank with 20mg/L of chlormaphenicol for 3 days . Each day do one iodine dip. Chlormaphenicol can be hard to get but it is very effective against RTN. In anycase I would frag it. Very sad to see.
 

OwenInAZ

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=15422063#post15422063 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by Maivortex
Looks like RTN (rapid tissue necrosis) . RTN is prolly the only thing that could destroy that much of a coral in 30 hrs. If you can get chlormaphenicol, Quarantine the coral in a separate tank with 20mg/L of chlormaphenicol for 3 days . Each day do one iodine dip. Chlormaphenicol can be hard to get but it is very effective against RTN. In anycase I would frag it. Very sad to see.

Wow, I thought to myself "surely chloramphenicol can't cure RTN." But thanks to the literature, turns out it can, or at least may be able to.

RTN correlates with higher numbers of Vibrio spp. bacteria in the coral tissues. Vibrio is sensitive to chloramphenicol, so could work. As mentioned above, the trick is going to be getting your hands on some. I have no idea how to do it as a private individual -- when I need it I just order it through the university credentials, but then again I have a legitimate lab use for it :)

Good luck with your coral, it really sucks to have a big colony like that go. :( I suppose the best thing to do is to frag frag frag and try to get ahead of the problem.


"Bacteria associated with the rapid tissue necrosis of stony corals" G. M. Luna, F. Biavasco, R. Danovaro. Environmental Microbiology, 2007:9:7 (p 1851-1857).

"Comparative Trial of Tetracycline, Chloramphenicol, and Trimethoprim Sulphamethoxazole in Eradication of Vibrio cholera El Tor" R. A. Gharagozloo, K. Naficy, M. Mouin, M. H. Nassirzadeh, and R. Yalda. British Metical Journal, 1970:4(5730): 281"“282.
 

o.c.d.

New member
After doing some research I was figuring one of the many diseases. I have other small frags in the tank from long ago and they were not infected. That is what doesn't make sence to me. The colony is gone I was able to frag some tips. I hope this is the end of it, Thanks again for the info
 

JAustin

Acropora Nut
Premium Member
How are the frags doing? I think i know what those little bugs are. Do they have two small dots for eyes and kinda look like pacman ghosts? If so they are harmless...they are just reacting to a new food souce from the dead tissue. AEFW would eat acropora so your good there.

Seratopora is a fragile coral. Good thing it's a fast grower. I've lost Pink BN and ORA Green BN from randome RTN.
 

o.c.d.

New member
Actually 75% of what I fragmented out turned white. I spread it around to many friends I can always get more. I'm trying to look at the bright side. It opened up a large area, maybe I'll spurge and find something to fit in that spot.
Those little critters are so small, I can't see the specs for eyes.
 

greenbean36191

Premium Member
RTN correlates with higher numbers of Vibrio spp. bacteria in the coral tissues.
Higher than normal Vibrio spp. concentrations are typical of corals dying from any number of reasons, from bleaching to excess DOC.
 

o.c.d.

New member
I've done two 15% water changes, My carbon and GFO are only a week old so no change,I added a sack of carbon in my skimmer output chamber. Hmm anything else. Everything is still happy all clams and coral fully extended. Frags that are let from colony are doing good now. Any other suggestions.
 
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