Need recommendation

Mighty Quinn

New member
Greetings Everyone,

I have a small (25 gallon) reef tank that has been established for about 3 years. I am looking for a good macroalgae that I can grow in this tank and prune periodically for nutrient export. I tried this once with caulerpa, but it quickly got out of control and took over the tank. It has taken me a solid year to finally get rid of it. I am hoping that one of you macroalgae experts can recommend a relatively fast growing, aesthetically pleasing macroalgae that will serve a similar purpose, but will be relatively easy to keep under control.

Here's a bit of information on my tank:
The tank has a deep sand bed and is dominated by soft corals (xenia, leather, ricordia). I have two fish: a lawnmower blenny and an ocellaris clown. I also have one astrea snail and one emerald crab. The tank gets daily feedings of DT's phytoplankton, cyclopeeze and a homemade frozen food blend for the fish. I also seem to be having good luck with a Botryocladia sp that grows in tight packed clusters and seems to be relatively easy to keep under control.

Thanks in advance for you advice.

Kindest regards,
Quinn
 

Mighty Quinn

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=6946622#post6946622 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by piercho
Do you want the algae to grow in the sandbed or attach to rock?
I guess that I really don't have a preference either way. What are the pros and cons of growing algae on the sandbed versus attached to the rocks?

Thanks,
Quinn
 

piercho

New member
Some algae, including a few specie of Caulerpa, grow well in sand. So they can be confined to the sandbed and kept off of the rock where they may become a problem.

In some tanks Sargassum grows well and can grow fast. It grows from a holdfast on the rock. It is bouyant and grows up rather than spreading across the rock. One of the best algae, IMO, for the display tank if there is enough light and nutrients for it to grow.

Caulerpa that can be kept in the sand include C. prolifera, feather caulerpa, and C. paspeloides. You have to keep the rhizome (root-like part) from creeping up and getting on the rock by frequent pruning. The rhizome on these algae grows down in the sand and these Caulerpa may be able to pull nutrients from the sand.

A couple of Halimedas will grow primarily from sand, like H. tuna. These are calcerous algae so they increase the alk/Ca demand on the tank. Another calcerous green that is fairly easy is Udotea. IME, neither of these are usually as productive as Caulerpa.

I've had mixed luck trying to grow Gracilaria on the sandbed. At moderate-low nutrient levels it can grow well and is attractive, plus it tends to stay prostrate and is very easy to control. Gracillaria mats are believed to be able to pull up nutrients from the sandbed. It doesn't grow well in all tanks, and many herbivores will graze it.
 

Mighty Quinn

New member
Howard,

Thanks for the suggestions! I think that I will stay away from Caulerpa sp. After fighting a plague of this algae for a year I am very reluctant to add it back into my tank.

I am interested in the Sargassum and may give that a try.

Thanks again!

Quinn
 

Ehgemus

New member
Chaetomorpha Macro Algae would be good you could pull it out when ever you don't want it anymore.
 
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