Octopus Coral

absoluteshawn

New member
Got an octopus coral when I ordered a branching Frogspawn. Anyone know anything about the coral itself? May be trading or selling. Not sure yet. Not what I was looking for. But I see they're pricey and rare to find online. What's the best place to put this for now?

octopus coral.jpg
 

absoluteshawn

New member

Deftones2015

New member
I have seen them sold on a few diff sites I frequent, not really uncommon. I would say treat like any other euphyllia.
 

ek9vboi

New member
It's not rare, more common then you think. They often call this type "grape coral" as it's family is with the hammer, froggy, and torch.
 

absoluteshawn

New member
It's not rare, more common then you think. They often call this type "grape coral" as it's family is with the hammer, froggy, and torch.

Out where i'm at in NJ... we are limited in the stores as to what's here. This i ordered in with a large order. Figured my guys were asking for Frogspawn frags so I could get one big one and get everyone a head or two. It was just listed as a Frogspawn Large. They shoulda specified. Oh well. It'll sell eventually. Just wanted to make sure the care was the same as branching.
 

Justin74

New member
I see A LOT of truths from experienced people here, BUT mixed with almost as much untruths, even from the 17 yr experience(no offense!). This thread is a perfect example how misinformation gets passed around region to region to the point it's accepted as common knowledge. Generalizations, and ol school words ;)

Euphyllia divisia aka frogspawn is not another word or ol school word for
octopus coral aka Euphyllia yaeyamensis. Two distinct species. HOWEVER! Both branch in growth form. I have a branching yaeyamensis at the museum where I work. Definitely way more uncommon.

you can see the difference pretty clearly the regular has 1-5 nodes on any given tenticle, while the octo will have 8+ on any given one, and looks a lot like a cluster of grapes, or more appropriatly octopus tenticles.

frogspawn:
http://sdmas.com/corals/147.php
octo:
http://sdmas.com/corals/419.php



-Justin
 

Justin74

New member
Doh! See, even I crossed em up unitentionally. Let me clarify.

What you got and didnt want is the first link I posted. And only walls in growth, considered meandering.

The second link is the octo, which does both. flabello-meandroid and phlacoid.

What I discombobulated was what we all commonly refer to as frogspawn, and the one you were intentionally seeking is paradivisia or Euphyllia paraglabrescens.

paradivisia's the one you usually see on here with people asking frog or hammer? :D As you see in the links, they come in both nodule forms. While paraancora is easy recognizable.

If you really look at the names you'll easily see a pattern as well, if it has "para" in front of it, it's branching; if it doesnt, it's meandering, or both.

Thought this was a helpful link in terminology in visual form:
http://www.coralhub.info/terms/meandering/

-Justin
 

trinidiver

New member
I see A LOT of truths from experienced people here, BUT mixed with almost as much untruths, even from the 17 yr experience(no offense!). This thread is a perfect example how misinformation gets passed around region to region to the point it's accepted as common knowledge. Generalizations, and ol school words ;)

Euphyllia divisia aka frogspawn is not another word or ol school word for
octopus coral aka Euphyllia yaeyamensis. Two distinct species. HOWEVER! Both branch in growth form. I have a branching yaeyamensis at the museum where I work. Definitely way more uncommon.

you can see the difference pretty clearly the regular has 1-5 nodes on any given tenticle, while the octo will have 8+ on any given one, and looks a lot like a cluster of grapes, or more appropriatly octopus tenticles.

frogspawn:
http://sdmas.com/corals/147.php
octo:
http://sdmas.com/corals/419.php



-Justin


wow this was great info. I had a cluster of Euphyllia divisa with about 20 heads and i traded in half for Euphyllia yaeyamaensis today and had no clue exactly what it was. All my LFS told me it was a type of frogspawn that he got from his supplier out of Miami. (it was the only piece) Its very unusual and i love it. I guess this was my best trade yet
 

hogfish

New member
anyway...wall frogspawns should generally be treated the same as branching. that said, i would put them in slightly lower flow than branching and I have also found that feeding meaty food is a necessity or should not be overlooked. it greatly increases the chances of surivival especially shortly after introduction. additionally, if you have the ability to frag the coral, keep in mind that if you start to see recession on any portion of the coral I would advise fragging on the dead tissue plus a bit of of healthy tissue to save the rest of the piece. necrotic tissue tends to cause the whole animal to die.
 

ilyad

New member
This thread was very informative! Loved to find out the difference between the two.

I am no expert being only in the hobby for 1 year, but I have seen many hundreds of the branching frogspawns at the great many fish stores we have here in So Cal, but I saw the other kind only once, at one store and only about 2 months ago for the first time. Even then it was not for sale... but I dont blame him, look at how cool it looks as a giant colony compared to the other kind

It was so cool I just had to take a picture
IMG_2652.jpg


IMG_2654.jpg


PS. This is a tank at my LFS and not mine (oh but I wish it was mine every time I see it! LOL :inlove:)
 
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