Phytoplankton culture.

PEZenfuego

In Memoriam
I am going to start a phytoplankton culture and have a few questions. I am wanting to do it in my garage because there is space for it there...but there are temperature fluctuations here. So the winter is probably a no no, but what about the summer?

I was also curious about what type of culture I should start. I think my tank would benefit from isochrysis better, but if my clowns decide to breed, I would probably want nannochloropsis for my rotifers, right? Any ideas? Thanks!
 

PEZenfuego

In Memoriam
I don't know where else to put it...where is yours? Well I assume it would be okay since people do it outside in the summer months...
 

WaterKeeper

Bogus Information Expert
Premium Member
Make yourself an insulated light box big enough to hold the culture vessels. You can add a warming mat if temperatures fall too much in the winter or even use a tank with a heater in the box to keep temps stable.
 

Flipper62

Premium Member
My thought about doing this years ago was. Is it really worth the hassle & room when you can just buy a bottle of DT's Phyto from the LFS for $20.00
 

PEZenfuego

In Memoriam
So you think it will be fine as it is this summer? I'm on a budget, so I would rather do it inside than buy extra things to keep the cultures warm/cool. I just thought the garage would keep it out of the way. I was planning on moving it in the house once summer ends.

What about the second part. Can you offer me help/info there?
 

PEZenfuego

In Memoriam
Recommendations as to what type of phyto I should get? Answer me this. Can rotifers be sustained solely on isochrysis?
 

billsreef

Moderator, 10 & Over Club
Premium Member
High summer temps are more of a problem than the cold winter if you can keep the cultures in the 50's at lowest.

As for type, Isochrysis is the single best, with Nanochloropsis the second. Yes, Iso can be used as the sole algae to feed your rots. Choice of algae is more about best nutrition for the larval fish than it is about the rots. While Iso it the best, it is more troublesome to culture than the Nano. Iso requires very good attention to sanitation of culture equipment and aggressive harvesting. While Nano is not as good nutritionally, it does work, and is more forgiving of inattention and therefore more commonly used by hobbyists.
 

PEZenfuego

In Memoriam
So I'll probably do it inside, I'll probably get nanno, and later I'll probably set up another culture station for iso. Thanks, my head is clear and I thank you very much.
 
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