Plywood and Styrofoam under tank Pros & Cons?

MeskeetDog

New member
Not really sure how to ask this question but basicly im setting up a tank and will be using a steel stand. I have seen in other peoples pictures that they use Styrofoam on the floor (not sure why here...should have a level floor already or used an industrial leveling compound as used for heavy machinery in a factory IMO) and /or on top of the stand... then a piece of plywood on top of the styrofoam... ugly if you ask me though. But some people use this method while others do not... Can someone enlighten me on this please?... thanks
 

shovel

New member
i think is i insulateing factor and or deadens sound that travels 5 times faster in water than in air i would like to know the real reason though to
 

MeskeetDog

New member
Not a leveling issue to reduce stress on tank (acrylic or glass)...hmmmm. ok makes a little more sense now. So basicly not necessary...
 

EnderG60

Plumbing Engineer
biggest reason ive seen it used is not to level the whole tank per say, but to level unevenness in the stand surface.

Not not necessary in most cases but, doesnt hurt either
 

reein101

New member
For me i used Styrofoam under most of my tank due to the fact that my bottom pain sets on the stand/ its not elevated and wood expands . The wood stand and the house expands with summer to winter temp changes, Im sure some one has a door that opens different in the winter than the summer this is the wood/ house expanding hope that heps!
It also does give a nice white look if bare bottom is used , say disply, frag tank ,
My one frag tank is BB and the white styrofoam make the light reflect around the tank .
 

uncleof6

New member
Styrofoam is used to eliminate point stress due to inconsistencies in the surface the tank is placed on. In actual use, it does not compress enough to make up for top leveling issues, or measurable irregularities, such as dips in the surface. In general it is only used on acrylic tanks, and glass tanks where the side panes are placed on the bottom pane, and there is no rim. A rimmed glass tank, generally does not require this, unless recommended by the builder, and in some cases can cause stress, and a resulting failure in the tank. The best and most reliable source of information on this is the tank manufacturer, rather than what may be common practice, or opinion.

Jim
 

uncleof6

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=14799464#post14799464 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by dave168
How thick the foam should be? and is it bigger the tank thicker the foam?

1/2 - 3/4" is most common.....get the take on this from the tank manufacturer.

Jim
 

hebygb

New member
+1 for Uof6 comments.

I use neoprene under my acrylic displays as well as sumps. under the display to keep the bottom pristine. under the sump to keep it pristine and to avoid water splashes ever hitting the painted wood surface in the stand. Water beads up, and is easily dabbed away. I think it is 5 mil.

The key here is to never depend on foam to make up for a poorly fabricated stand.
 

papajojo

New member
i am building a stand way over built for a 180... the problem is i will be placing the stand on uneven tile 1/8th of an inch unlevel. i was going to use strofaom1/2in under the top board3/4in plywood the tank is a glass rimmed tank will this solve the 1/8" uneveness?
thanks and sorry to hijack
 

uncleof6

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=14803275#post14803275 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by papajojo
i am building a stand way over built for a 180... the problem is i will be placing the stand on uneven tile 1/8th of an inch unlevel. i was going to use strofaom1/2in under the top board3/4in plywood the tank is a glass rimmed tank will this solve the 1/8" uneveness?
thanks and sorry to hijack

level the stand on the tile, not the tank on the stand. far less of a risk.

Jim
 

uncleof6

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=14803686#post14803686 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by bananaboat
i always belived it was to correct any imperfections in the stand

To relieve point stress caused by irregularities in the surface of the stand, not to correct stand structure problems, or non-level problems with the floor. For stand porblems, fix the stand, for floor problems level the stand or fix the floor.....:)

Jim
 
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