Powder Blue tang advice

philip5510

New member
hey guys.

i have a 90g reef tank with a Purple tang, Mystery wrasse and majestic Angel.

i want to add a powder blue tang as my second and final tang.

any info, advice or pictures of your PBT would be great

thanks in advance
 

hgbarwick

New member
PBT's IMO get to big for a 90. I have a purple in my 90 and he will attack any thing that resembles a tang, or angel. So chances are your tang will attack another tang if you add one.
 

EdKruzel

Premium Member
I'd have to agree that you're about maxed out on larger species, but you still have plenty of room for smaller ones and inverts.
 

nava405

New member
you'll be fine, i had PBT in my 75 gallon before, just make sure you get a smaller one. Piece of advise, PBT gets ich easily..
 
I saw a powder blue tang at my LFS recently - he was about 6-7". He had been returned to the shop (reason unkown - didn't ask) but he was a 3-4" and grew to 6-7" in a little over a year.... he was in a 4' tank and looked very cramped...... and pretty aggressive too - displaying at everything - including people walking past.

Having not kept a powder blue, but having kept several allegedly less agressive tangs, I would not put one in your tank..... 12 months down the road he's gonna be pretty big and will probably bully the other tang and angel......... shortly after that he's probably gonna outgrow your tank if he's fed properly.....

This is a classic example of "just because you can, it doesn't mean you should".

HTH and good luck with your decision.

Matt
 

Benny Z

In Memoriam
i wouldn't keep a bpt in anything shorter than a 6' tank, especially with an already-established zebrasoma. you're bound to have issues.
 

EdKruzel

Premium Member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10421681#post10421681 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by nava405
Piece of advise, PBT gets ich easily..

That label is a misnomer as any fish in an unsuitable container will contract disease or parasites. Some fish such as clowns are actually better off in a home aquarium then in the sea. Their territories are small and can be duplicated in most average or large tanks, but without predators while their meals are always delivered; no more hunting. With nominal care, many report a lifespan of over 20yrs with some going over 40yrs.

On the other side of the spectrum we have tangs which in the wild start a territory of no less than a large apartment up to nearly an acre. Tangs for the most part are peaceful in nature, but even with such large grazing territories, you will notice them attack rival schools or other grazing species when on their patch of algae. The diet is easy to duplicate, but the level of water purity and high oxygen content are a bit more challenging. It always amazes me that someone who has kids or dogs or cats, or just about any land pet will spend huge amounts of money and search frantically within the environment for a cause if the above mentioned becomes ill (and you should, it's called compassion) but when their fish contract parasites, it's written off as the damn fish is an ich magnet.
 

Asuran

New member
a 4ft tank when its less than 4 inchs will be ok but look to upgrade to atleast a 6ft tank... i had one that was in a 4ft 110g and it was cramped... i upgraded to a 6ft but it didnt make the transfer (my mistake) i have bought another one and this one is happy in a 6ft but is definately the king of the tank. they will fight and may work out a pecking order or they may not... because my last PBT was mellow compared to the one i have now
 

fishyvet

New member
At times my PBT looks cramped in my 210. This fish has crazy swimming fits and darts all over the tank weaving in and out of the rockwork. Since owning this fish, I couldn't imagine it in anything less than a 6' tank. Of course a cramped environment is probably why this fish is given its "aggressive" and "ich magnet" labels. Please consider carefully before you purchase this fish.
 
just to follow from the "ich" comment...... I have had an "ich" epidemic for the last few weeks..... so I've done quite alot of reading and researching, and form what I can gather, it is possible to totally eliminatethe ich parasite. i.e. run the display, fish free for 4-6 weeks, without a host the parasite cannot remain dormant for more than this period..... so the display is ich free. Step two, all fish, and indeed anything wet is quarantined, with hypo where possible, for 4-6 weeks - hence no ich can survive here either.

So, basically you end up with an ich free system and an ich free fish......... the PBT would seem like a good candidate for this.....

In theory, it should solve the issue of PBT's being so called "ich magnets".........

Thoughts???

This does not of course mitigate the circumstances that would have resulted in the fish getting ich in the first place.... stress is stress, and that will take its toll in one form or the other....... but the stress can, in my view, be dealth with easier than ich.... i.e. if its fighting.... move a fish, if its diet - improve the diets..... whatever...... all easier than dealing with ich, inmy view.

Thoughts foks......
 

xxseawolf

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=10424991#post10424991 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by EdKruzel
That label is a misnomer as any fish in an unsuitable container will contract disease or parasites. Some fish such as clowns are actually better off in a home aquarium then in the sea. Their territories are small and can be duplicated in most average or large tanks, but without predators while their meals are always delivered; no more hunting. With nominal care, many report a lifespan of over 20yrs with some going over 40yrs.

On the other side of the spectrum we have tangs which in the wild start a territory of no less than a large apartment up to nearly an acre. Tangs for the most part are peaceful in nature, but even with such large grazing territories, you will notice them attack rival schools or other grazing species when on their patch of algae. The diet is easy to duplicate, but the level of water purity and high oxygen content are a bit more challenging. It always amazes me that someone who has kids or dogs or cats, or just about any land pet will spend huge amounts of money and search frantically within the environment for a cause if the above mentioned becomes ill (and you should, it's called compassion) but when their fish contract parasites, it's written off as the damn fish is an ich magnet.
well said
 
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