PVC leaks...

Katmanblue

New member
Hello all, thanks for reading.
I set up all my plumbing for my sump and I followed most conventional direction by using slip fits instead of gluing/cementing the joints. Reasoning was that this would help with maintainence, repairs, etc. Problem is: on both the drain and return, where I have used 45 degree joints I am getting small leaks. They are just small beads of water, nothing major (yet?)--should I be concerned or is this what most people do? Should I take them apart and cement them sealed?

Thanks in advance.
 

MSU Fan

New member
So you used slip PVC parts and you didn't glue them together? And now it's leaking? That sounds about accurate to me. AFAIK you are supposed to glue the slip parts, and not glue the threaded connections (use putty or teflon tape on those).
 

BeanAnimal

Premium Member
Re: PVC leaks...

<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=15436307#post15436307 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by Katmanblue
Hello all, thanks for reading.
I set up all my plumbing for my sump and I followed most conventional direction by using slip fits instead of gluing/cementing the joints.

A SLIP joint is a glue/cement type joint. They are not designed to be used without solvent cement!

Anything external to the tank, or that could come apart and cuase a flood should be fully cemented or threaded. Most of us consider plumbing permanent and insall unions (or true union ball valves) in areas where we know we will need to remove parts of the system (for example at both sides of the return pump).
 

hndakd

New member
i just went through this also, but on a little larger scale. Do as bean says it will solve all your problems. if you want to get something apart later do a union. FYI all threaded fittings need dope on them (thats what my problem was.... not enough dope) lol
 

Katmanblue

New member
Re: Re: PVC leaks...

Re: Re: PVC leaks...

<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=15436492#post15436492 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by BeanAnimal
A SLIP joint is a glue/cement type joint. They are not designed to be used without solvent cement!

Anything external to the tank, or that could come apart and cuase a flood should be fully cemented or threaded. Most of us consider plumbing permanent and insall unions (or true union ball valves) in areas where we know we will need to remove parts of the system (for example at both sides of the return pump).

I have the unions, but just to confirm--because I'm seriously challenged in this regard. Once the union is cemented to the drainage and return pipes under the tank, I have no way of ever removing them except by sawing them. The unions wont fit up through the bulkhead openings. I do see how the union will allow me to remove everything below it, but everything above it would be a permanent fixture.
 
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