RO Water Storage

cybball

New member
I have a Typhoon III and a 55 gallon plastic barrel. I also bought the float that Typhoon sells as a shut off. Where can I find a small flow valve for the bottom to open and fill my water bottles? Do you guys put pumps in the storage tanks or a flow valve? Curious. That is the only thing I need to figure out before setting up.
Thanks,
Jason
 

jtesdall

Premium Member
I put a pump in the storage tank and pump water right up through a manifold to all of my tanks (or sump) that are fitted with a float valve. I have freshwater as well so this works great. But you do need a way to run the tubing.

If you are going to carry the water I would reccomend going to Lowes and buying a small utility/sump pump to fill bottles or buckets. You are going to spend enough time hauling those things around, might as well fill them as quickly as possible. If what you are talking about is a gravity fed valve (not sure what you mean by flow valve) then it will be slow. Plus you won't be able to empty your strorage vessel in the case you need 50 gallons of water. A pump will solve these issues.
 

jbrunken

New member
My RO/DI fills a 32G. rubbermaid trashcan. The RO/DI is turned on/off via a float switch I mounted at the top of the trashcan.

I put a bulkhead on the side of the can that is plumbed to a small rio pump. It's not the fastest thing it the world, but it does get the job done.

I agree that a gravity fed system would probably be annoyingly slow for regular maintenance activities.

-JB
 

KnoxvilleIa

New member
ro

ro

mine is hooked up the same way direct from ro to a float valve and also to my tanks via float valve also.

I'm remembering murphys law, going to redo my top off system
I can see a float valve sticking, diluting the salinity untill I kill off a lot of stuff. I'm shure it will happen if I don't correct the situation.
going to use parastaltic pumps on a timer.
not cheap but I can see a failure comming.
I'm going to reverce my opinion and say I would never advise hooking up a ro unit to a float valve in a tank.
failure in a holding tank is only a mess.
In a tank could mean a loss of livestock.
 

jtesdall

Premium Member
I've got a timer on my pump as well. So if the float valve does fail it will only dilute a little and fill my sump. It runs 20 minutes a night through a 1/4 inch tubing. There is a chance for failure but hopefully with proper maintenance the worst case is a little dilution and bit of water on the basement floor. I guess my freshwater tanks upstairs would get the carpet wet as well, not like that hasn't happened before. ;0)
 

cybball

New member
Sounds like a pump may be the way to go. Gravity flow is what I meant, but a pump would make filling water bottles or buckets fast. I don't make a ton of water now, but I tend to forget it's on and leave it flowing for days. Not good. I have it at my floor drain, so no mess, but I blow through cartridges very fast. Hence the reason for buying the float.
 

jtesdall

Premium Member
The floats are a must have IMO. How is your water bill?? Leaving an RO running will pay for that float in no time, especially for me on rural water. It's expensive.

Remeber, a utility/sump pump at Lowes, Home Depot/Menards should be about $50-$60. They are great and take a standard hose connection.
 

cybball

New member
Water bill will be scary. Also had to pay for a new DI cartridge. The float will pay for itself for sure.
 
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