Seagrass for sale ?

Pigpen17

New member
Hello RC plant addicts!

Was just reading the two seagrass threads I'm here. Awesome stuff.

I am just starting out on the idea of adding seagrass to my tank. Not a bunch. Just a bit. I was looking at turtle grass or shoal grass. Where is a good site for buying seagrass? I can find none.
 

Pigpen17

New member
Right on. That was the only site I was able to find. Out of stock of course. Thanks. I'll keep checking back there.
 

Amphiprion

Premium Member
Do also check Divers Den on the LA site. I've seen them very occasionally offering seagrass seeds. It has been a while since I've seen them, though. I can't remember if they were Thalassia hemprichii or Enhalus acoroides seeds.
 

Pigpen17

New member
Thanks. I just about have the plan for my tank done. Availability of seagrass is almost the last step.
 

Dmorty217

Saltwater Addict
Sea grass doesn't export as much nitrates or phosphates compared to chaeto. Not sure if you just like the look or were trying to reduce nutrients
 

Pigpen17

New member
Sea grass doesn't export as much nitrates or phosphates compared to chaeto. Not sure if you just like the look or were trying to reduce nutrients

Both, but I think I am more concerned with the look. I am not really having a problem with Phosphates or Nitrates........yet, but I thought it couldn't hurt. Every little bit, right? Plus I am not 100% on my fish, but I would like some established plant life for nibbling, if needed. I am sure seagrass is not the best for that either, so yeah, I guess it's the look.

Not that I am opposed to adding other, better suited plants as well, but I do want to keep it minimal for the most part. I started reading some of the threads in here, and it's a whole 'nother kettle of fish!
 

Amphiprion

Premium Member
It is certainly a bit different, though conditions need not be terribly different. Many seagrasses do very well with just a slightly mature substrate and typical reef aquarium-quality water parameters. They tolerate and do well in lower nutrients than many macroalgae. Anything that encourages lots of pest algal growth and cyanobacteria won't be terribly good for your seagrasses, as they can be smothered. Higher nutrients also can encourage anoxia, which will rot the roots/rhizomes and kill the plants.

In any case, I encourage you to keep reading about them and pursue a nice display that includes them. Contrary to what some may think, you need not exclude most corals in such a display, so it can be a fairly diverse setup. If you need inspiration, there are lots of pics online of patch reefs and lagoons with both seagrass and corals (including some Acropora, Porites, Montipora, etc.) together. It can make for a very striking, yet under-appreciated display.
 

Pigpen17

New member
Thanks!

If I can acheive anything even close to what is in my mind, I think it will be damn spanky! Lot's more reading to do though.

One thing in your post, my sand is fine, which I read is a benifit?, but it is not very old. It's been intank for about 5 months now. Maybe that is just too young. I do have some cyno and green hair as well, none of which is out of control. In fact it's at a low point and just stays there. I kind of like it. I have almost no algea growth on my glass or equiptment either.
 

Amphiprion

Premium Member
Thanks!

If I can acheive anything even close to what is in my mind, I think it will be damn spanky! Lot's more reading to do though.

One thing in your post, my sand is fine, which I read is a benifit?, but it is not very old. It's been intank for about 5 months now. Maybe that is just too young. I do have some cyno and green hair as well, none of which is out of control. In fact it's at a low point and just stays there. I kind of like it. I have almost no algea growth on my glass or equiptment either.

Fine sand will work fine, though a mix works well, too. If you have corals that require a bit more water motion, you can incorporate some larger grain sizes on top of finer sand to accommodate it. Grasses actually grow in a variety of grain sizes, depending upon their location, though I would say that finer sizes are probably the most common. 5 months could be okay, as you don't need a lot of organic content--just a bit is all that is necessary. They can actually be placed in brand-new sand, but it makes things a lot more difficult than it has to be.
 

Pigpen17

New member
Good to know. I don't want to have to reinvent the tank, but I do want to have sucess. And there is the line I will be walking.

Unless, of course I get addicted to marine plants.
 

Pigpen17

New member
I know what I was forgetting. Can you run sea grass with SPS? Specifically, will elevated calcium levels damage them? I have gone through the SPS coral forum and come out with a plan of one birds nest. From what they have told me the calcium requirement for one would not be significant. I may just get away with using reef salt and not having to dose. It sounds good, but I don’t want to get myself into a situation where helping one thing in my tank is hurting another.

As crazy as it sounds to most, probably not to the plant freaks in here, the SPS will lose out if I can only have one or the other. That is if it is ever in stock!
 

Pigpen17

New member
AH. never mind. I see that this was answered above. Sorry. A lot of stuff is going through my mind for this build. I have my finger in quite a few pots ATM.
 

Amphiprion

Premium Member
Sounds like you found your answer :). But to re-verify, yes you can keep many of these corals with seagrasses. If that is closer to where you are leaning, Thalassia seem to do very well with comparatively clean water--more so than other species, IME. while Thalassia are pickier than other species initially, they've been rock-solid once established, shrugging off quite a bit of things that affect other faster growing grasses.
 

Pigpen17

New member
Sounds like you found your answer :). But to re-verify, yes you can keep many of these corals with seagrasses. If that is closer to where you are leaning, Thalassia seem to do very well with comparatively clean water--more so than other species, IME. while Thalassia are pickier than other species initially, they've been rock-solid once established, shrugging off quite a bit of things that affect other faster growing grasses.


My search popped up Thalassia as turtle grass? Turtle Grass was my first thought. Shoal Grass might be more what I am picturing though. Either will do really as far as the look. And I am thinking of a single CAULERPA PROLIFERA. From what I have read, they won't grow on your rocks. I think that is a plus when dealing with any Caulerpa. I do want to add something nibbly that won't take over.

This whole thing is to possibly one day house a Multibar Angelfish. The tank I have in my head would do nicely, I think. I feel like to have success with this, you need lot's of food naturally in the tank, plus a mix of good cover and open spots. I am even thinking of Xenia as a possible food source. Anything really.

I have a long way to go before even thinking about this fish and a lot to learn on many fronts. Thanks for taking the time to help me.
 
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