Should I add phosguard or change something else? Pics

fronty

New member
I have been slowly increasing my light output on my led's (ai nano) (5 percent a week). My sps corals started growing faster. I think I have a cyano outbreak (pics below). Also, my torch coral has retracted. I'm not sure if this is due to the light increase. I have not increased feedings. Unfortunately, I do not have a phosphate meter. All of my other parameters are fine.

I cut back on feedings. I'm debating on whether I should cut the lighting back down or add phosguard. My SPS are finally starting to grow.

photo1-27.jpg


I believe this is cyano dangling on the bottom of my frag rack.

photo2-27.jpg


Bubbles start forming on my live rock in the evening.

photo-15.jpg


photo-14.jpg
 

fronty

New member
Looks more like dinoflagellates to me. Completely different, and more difficult attack plan.



I think you may be right. What is the best course of action?

I'm thinking about doing the following:

-3 day black out
-Continue to feed on a reduced schedule
-change carbon
-try to do a manual cleanup and 25 percent water change at the end of the period


My alk is already at 9, so I don't think it will help much to increase it more. Should I try increasing the alk levels?

I may go ahead and add phosguard as well.

What are your thoughts?
 

coralsnaked

New member
Dinos are real bee-otch! You can fight them till you are blue in the face and want to :headwally: People talk about them like :deadhorse1: But here is the only way I have seen them beat. Just keep your lighting schedule feeding schedule and everything the same. Stop exporting nutients. Floss sock skimming GFO etc... Let the competeing algae hair and otherwise as well as cyano take over. They will in time outcompete the dinos and they will decline. Then you can deal with the algae and cyano in normal fashion. Only other thing is to pull it off your coral daily while doing this to keep them from succumbing to the onslought. I am sorry to say the only other thing you can do is bleach the tank and throw out the coral and then re-cycle the rock...everything else like blackouts ect... is just a waste of time
 

bertoni

Premium Member
Personally, I'd try a GFO product because that approach is easy and relatively expensive, and sometimes works. If that doesn't work, you could try other steps.

For the torch coral, I might try a few 10-15% water changes and run some fresh carbon. During the water changes, I'd try to remove as much of the slime as is easy to get, to export nutrients and possibly reduce any toxin output.
 
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