temps at 86-88

rsantangelo3@co

New member
CAn coral be kept successfully at temps of 86 to 88? Also will adding a fan on my 250 watt halide help elimante some temps and if so how many degrees. Tanks it basement with high humidity and temp. My fowler is around 84-85. Please advice. a 30 cube so really dont wanna run a chiller.
 

cloak

New member
As long as it's not like that for days on end it should be ok. A few days here and there is nothing to worry about, at least IME. Running a fan across the surface of the water would really help. I'd say it would probably drop the temp by about 3 or 4 degrees maybe. You'll have to compensate though, your tank will be evaporating even more water so you'll have to stay up on your top offs.
 

rsantangelo3@co

New member
ive read keep ones tank to 88-90 is fine. Its more the fluctuation. Also on that note if its 88 during the way and 82-80 at night will this be enough flux to throw off the coral into stress?
 

wrott

New member
A fan on a controller will keep it 81-82F with MH.
This is what I am currently using on my 65g since the chiller broke.
I have a 250w and 150w MH, w/ a small fan on the tank. With a RK-lite it stays 79-81F. W/out the fan, the temp would be ~79-84F.
I believe some corals would adapt fine to that temp, and I'm sure that some would not.
 

Peter Eichler

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=15461073#post15461073 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by rsantangelo3@co
ive read keep ones tank to 88-90 is fine. Its more the fluctuation. Also on that note if its 88 during the way and 82-80 at night will this be enough flux to throw off the coral into stress?

Constant temps of 88-90 are going to be near the upper limits of what many corals can can handle. So be careful once you start getting close to 90 degrees.

Natural reefs fluctuate in temperate throughout the day and typically swing by 5ish degrees farenheit from day to night. So, most corals and fish are quite equipped to handle less than stable conditions and there's evidence to suggest that fluctuations will help corals cope with more drastic fluctuations should they occur.
 

da1jewfish

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=15461265#post15461265 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by Peter Eichler
Constant temps of 88-90 are going to be near the upper limits of what many corals can can handle. So be careful once you start getting close to 90 degrees.

Natural reefs fluctuate in temperate throughout the day and typically swing by 5ish degrees farenheit from day to night. So, most corals and fish are quite equipped to handle less than stable conditions and there's evidence to suggest that fluctuations will help corals cope with more drastic fluctuations should they occur.

Had to comment on this. You will never see reef temperatures (the ocean) varying 5 degrees from day to night when the temp is taken from the same place each time. The most it will change is a degree and usually a half a degree, unless changing seasons.

Water is resistent to large fluctuations (b/c its chemical properties), the more water the less it can fluctuate in a short period of time.
 

greenbean36191

Premium Member
You will never see reef temperatures (the ocean) varying 5 degrees from day to night when the temp is taken from the same place each time.
These types of temperature ranges are well documented to be frequent occurrences on reefs worldwide- often within minutes to hours, not day to night.

Water is resistent to large fluctuations (b/c its chemical properties), the more water the less it can fluctuate in a short period of time.
The water around reefs is not a homogeneous temperature. All the water has to do to induce fluctuations is move, not wait for the sun to heat it over the course of the day. Tidal flushing and internal waves flush over most reefs, exposing them to quick heating or cooling.
 

rsantangelo3@co

New member
Awsome- To know what happens in the wild is some interesting stuff. With that said am I ok with these higher temps or will it pose a problem?
 

Tadashi

Premium Member
Dr Shimek advocated temps around 86. I kept mine at 84, between the fan, chiller, and heaters I would not even have a deg of flucuation. If no chiller just use a fan but it will cause more evap.
 

sanababit

New member
80 to 85 here, no problems, never used a chiller and only have a fan over the sump for cooling if the temp goes to 86...

sana
 

serpentman

part time superhero
Keep in mind the warmer water holds less oxygen. That, coupled with increased metabolic rates means you will need to make sure your bioload isn't too high.
 

cody6766

Super Best Friends!
Premium Member
only if they're causing surface agitation. Otherwise they just move it around. Because they move water and cause the surface to change they will help SOME, but I think a powerhead's contribution would be minimal. A sump or a skimmer would aid in oxygenation though.
 

TWallace

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=15461837#post15461837 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by greenbean36191
These types of temperature ranges are well documented to be frequent occurrences on reefs worldwide- often within minutes to hours, not day to night.


The water around reefs is not a homogeneous temperature. All the water has to do to induce fluctuations is move, not wait for the sun to heat it over the course of the day. Tidal flushing and internal waves flush over most reefs, exposing them to quick heating or cooling.

Anyone's who's ever snorkeled over a reef should be able to confirm this. I've felt temperature changes rapidly while snorkeling in Mexico and Malaysia just from the ocean current. I even swam through a very shallow area loaded with crocea clams where the water felt at least 90 degrees due to the shallow depth and stagnant water. That same area also housed several anemones with ocellaris clowns in them.
 

magikfly

New member
+1
Unbelievable, you'd think most people here have at least come in contact with the sea at least once..


<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=15461837#post15461837 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by greenbean36191
These types of temperature ranges are well documented to be frequent occurrences on reefs worldwide- often within minutes to hours, not day to night.


The water around reefs is not a homogeneous temperature. All the water has to do to induce fluctuations is move, not wait for the sun to heat it over the course of the day. Tidal flushing and internal waves flush over most reefs, exposing them to quick heating or cooling.
 

Peter Eichler

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=15464237#post15464237 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by serpentman
Keep in mind the warmer water holds less oxygen. That, coupled with increased metabolic rates means you will need to make sure your bioload isn't too high.

In difference in the amount of oxygen 86 degree water can hold vs. what 76 degree water can hold is small. It's so small that it probably never should have been brought up years ago in arguments such as this, yet it keeps getting repeated as a result of those old arguments. In a well setup aquarium Oxygen levels will be beyond what is neccessary for its inhabitants even at temperatures beyond their natural range. In short, if a tank is overstock at 85 degrees, it's still overstocked at 75 degrees.

You can create some slippery slopes where keeping an aquarium a few degrees higher in temp could have deleterious effects as a result of the oxygen content, but in reality those slopes will effortlessly avoided by most aquariums.
 
Top