the deadliest parameter

Sk8r

Staff member
RC Mod
salinity.
That's virtually the whole reason for acclimation at all. Matching salinity. Changing it v-e-r-y slowly.
Inverts, and shelled inverts in particular, go into osmotic shock (cell damage) if not acclimated properly.

If you have a salinity accident, say with topoff: correct it slowly---unless you catch it in actual progress, and then be careful. Raise it by topping off evaporation loss with salt water; lower it by topping off with fresh water and dipping out a cupful ever half hour (of say, a 50 gallon tank)over the next day. That is what I mean by 'slowly.'

If your critters have survived GETTING to a bad salinity level, don't double the damage by correcting it too fast. Remember the damage is done mostly by a difference in osmotic pressure on one side or the other of cell walls: if you change it slowly, the osmotic pressure equalizes slowly, and there is no cell rupture. Otherwise, the cell wall can literally blow out. What organ takes the hardest hit? The kidneys, whose job it is to correct fluid balances. Death from kidney failure takes days, hence the: "But he was doing fine in my tank yesterday..."

TO SHORTEN ACCLIMATION TIME during which ph can *also* become a lethal element---have your quarantine tank pre-set to the salinity of your fish store before your fish comes home. You can thus transfer your fish safely to the qt tank pretty well immediately (temperature should be same) and use topoff to gradually shift the salinity of your qt tank to match your home tank.
 

Aquarist007

New member
I would highly recommend the use of a refractometer for measuring salinity. This will give you much more accuracy then a hydrometer
When performing hyposalinity for ich the salinity is brought down to 1.009 which is very close to the inside chemistry of fish(1.008) so it is very important to be accurate

refractometer.jpg


Excellent topic for a thread Sk8r
 

Sitarangi

New member
Due to sloppy top off changes from someone tank sitting for me, I came home to a salinity of .30 I took about 8 gallons and swapped them with distilled water and was able to get it down to .23. All of my xenia were balled up. My schooling chromis all made it for one corner, I didnt see my firefish for days. The only guy who didnt seem to care was my mandarin who continued to chill around the rocks minding his own business. After a couple days, everyone was fine.
 

Aquarist007

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=12897593#post12897593 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by Sitarangi
Due to sloppy top off changes from someone tank sitting for me, I came home to a salinity of .30 I took about 8 gallons and swapped them with distilled water and was able to get it down to .23. All of my xenia were balled up. My schooling chromis all made it for one corner, I didnt see my firefish for days. The only guy who didnt seem to care was my mandarin who continued to chill around the rocks minding his own business. After a couple days, everyone was fine.

you got lucky;)
 

snorvich

Team RC member
Team RC
Yes, you got lucky. I suspect you also lowered the salinity too quickly and you went too low. I hope you are using a calibrated refractometer to measure salinity.
 

Sitarangi

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=12897709#post12897709 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by snorvich
Yes, you got lucky. I suspect you also lowered the salinity too quickly and you went too low. I hope you are using a calibrated refractometer to measure salinity. [/QUOT

Yea it is, basically I think it was waaaaay above .30 because the thing went past the 30 and as far as the waterline would let it. This was actually 4 days ago, I tested the water and its at a nice .23 now.
 

Aquarist007

New member
what is not evident yet is the damage to the inverts in the water column, live rock and substrate, This includes bacteria
I would monitor for ammonia over the next week or two
 

kevin2000

Registered Member
Is salinity important - yeah but lets not forget that many of the critters in the ocean experience temperature and salinity changes with every tide change or every rainfall. Further ... I suspect most reefers don't have auto top offs .. and every day their tanks get higher salinity and when the aquarist does top off it changes rapidly back to whatever the norm the aquarist have set.

Long and short ... most of the critters in our tank are tougher than we think.
 

ToxicPoison

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=12897563#post12897563 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by capn_hylinur
I would highly recommend the use of a refractometer for measuring salinity. This will give you much more accuracy then a hydrometer
When performing hyposalinity for ich the salinity is brought down to 1.009 which is very close to the inside chemistry of fish(1.008) so it is very important to be accurate

refractometer.jpg


Excellent topic for a thread Sk8r
[/QUOTE

Excellent info as always guys :).

Quick question, what is the preferred salinity for a fresh QT tank (Not treating fish that already sick, but rather new inhabitants).
I've heard keeping the salinity lower (1.010 or so) helps prevent disease breakouts.

Any thoughts on this? I'm sure you'd have to do another acclimation after QT.

Thanks folks!
 

twoodall

New member
I am a newbie, but I would think salinity is most important, just for the simple fact we are talking salt water inhabitants. The majority of which couldn't survive in fresh. Sure all those other play a factor, but salinity rates at the top.

Just my humble opinion!

I am glad to see FedEx will be delivering my refractometer tomorrow!
 

saltee dood

New member
quick question that kinda goes with the topic I think...

just got my refracto in today, and I was wondering what yall use to calibrate it? Directions say distilled water, is that effectively the same as RO/DI water?
 

Sitarangi

New member
Personally I think the deadliest parameter would be temperature. While it may be the easiest to fix and monitor, it can go ignored in the blistering summer heat and sink into the 84s and 86s. Fish can tolerate a high salinity (though they'd be pretty stressed) but lets see how long they can last in an 86 degree tank.....

Also PH, that sinks to low and kiss anything that has calcium carbonate goodbye....
 

erbio

Premium Member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=12898424#post12898424 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by twoodall
I am a newbie, but I would think salinity is most important, just for the simple fact we are talking salt water inhabitants. The majority of which couldn't survive in fresh. Sure all those other play a factor, but salinity rates at the top.

Just my humble opinion!

I am glad to see FedEx will be delivering my refractometer tomorrow!

Lesson #1 (which you'll learn sooner or later) is that post count does not correspond to knowledge of the hobby.

It is a fact that salinity is vital but we're discussing which parameter is most vital.
 

twoodall

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=12898616#post12898616 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by erbio
Lesson #1 (which you'll learn sooner or later) is that post count does not correspond to knowledge of the hobby.

It is a fact that salinity is vital but we're discussing which parameter is most vital.

Looking back I don't see where I addressed a post count. I do realize that some read, learn, experiment, and then choose not to share what they have learned. Thus potentially a low post count number. I don't think that is the point of this discussion. Seems that post counts are your observation.

We have a difference in opinion. Perhaps my observation was from a very basic stand point, not filled with years, experience, or knowledge in the hobby. Contribute that to the number of post or the amount of experience in this hobby.

My view point/opinion is that salinity is the MOST vital parameter, based on the environment from which the species we all select come from. Split hairs all you wish, you are going to have a tough time getting a reef dweller to dwell along a fallen log in fresh water, no matter what the PH level.

In light of my lack of knowledge/post count perhaps you could elaborate/educate me on your point of view as to what you think is the MOST vital parameter. Rather than expressing agreement with someone with no details as to why. After all it is a discussion!
 

snorvich

Team RC member
Team RC
Post count is irrelevant. Back to a refractometer, calibrate either with Pinpoint calibrating solution (1.0264) or with Randy's home made solution. RO or distilled water should NOT be used to calibrate.

For the record, I think that salinity issues causes more problems than any other parameter.
 

Agu

Premium Member
Not to be contrary but the deadliest parameter is the aquarist who doesn't know what he's doing or just doesn't care.

Equipment will fail and things will go wrong in this hobby, that's a given. The aquarist who doesn't keep track of what's going on or doesn't know what to look for kills more livestock than any other parameter.

jmo,
 

Aquarist007

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=12898460#post12898460 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by saltee dood
quick question that kinda goes with the topic I think...

just got my refracto in today, and I was wondering what yall use to calibrate it? Directions say distilled water, is that effectively the same as RO/DI water?

You use pinpoint refractor solution. It is set so you get a specific gravity reading of 35 which is normal sea water.
 
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