Truth about large tanks on 2nd floor??

jusmebabe

New member
Thinking of adding a larger FOWLR tank (75-100 gal).
I plan to have it against the wall in my living room.
My condo is upstairs, so what's the real truth about weight?
I've heard different things but someone experienced said its a myth that the tank will crash thru the floor. The person at the LFS (only work with saltwater) said it's common for people to think that but it will be fine. Anyone have thoughts on this?
Just need some reassurance that I won't come home and see a big hole in the floor lol.
 

ellevan11

New member
I live in a condo unit on the second floor. I have a 100g DT and 50g fuge. I don't think it would be a problem, but i could not tell for sure about the structural integrity of your building. I checked with the association and they had the property engineer OK it with absolutely no concerns. Although, when the unit below me is having a loud party at 3am, there is a little part of me that hopes it would fall to break that crap up.
 

Aristarchus

New member
I had a 125 gallon fresh water tank in a second story apartment and I wouldn't suggest it. The tank was set up for approximately 6 months, and when I took it down and moved it the floor was bowed. There was about a half inch gap between the trim and the carpet. Could have been due to old construction, who knows. But if I had the option to do it again, I wouldn't.
 

jbird69

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=15447557#post15447557 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by Aristarchus
I had a 125 gallon fresh water tank in a second story apartment and I wouldn't suggest it. The tank was set up for approximately 6 months, and when I took it down and moved it the floor was bowed. There was about a half inch gap between the trim and the carpet. Could have been due to old construction, who knows. But if I had the option to do it again, I wouldn't.

In most carpentry situations, when installing base moulding prior to carpet install, we shim the base up 1/2" It gives the carpet guy somewhere to tuck his edge. Same goes for door casing.

(edit) oops I just reread your post...you said 1/2 "above carpet"

back to the subject.... 75-100 gal should be fine.
 

Mike31154

New member
The approximate filled weight of a 70 is 670 lbs, probably close to what a very large bathtub would weigh. A 110 gal is just under 1100 lbs full. Add a sump and a few folks standing around the tank admiring it, you're getting up around 1600 lbs. If the set up is along the wall supported by at least 3 beams under the floor (depending on construction) you may be ok with the 110. Better check on the construction first though and I'm not a structural guy so it's just a best guess.
 

jusmebabe

New member
I appreciate the feedback. I now feel comfortable only wish I had known about RC when I got my 40 gal tank a few months ago I;d have a big tank now lol.
Again thanx guys
:bum:
 

PRDubois

New member
75-100 gal should be fine.

Floor joists are floor joists. The builder will use the same joists on the 1st and 2nd floor. As long as it is near a load bearing wall and it is lined up to cross the joists and not run with them.

You can yse a stud finder to find out which way your joists run.
 

reefscape15

New member
People put water beds on the second floor, and then sleep on them all night too. Not to mention, making the motion of the ocean, which can cause a lot of stress on different parts of the floor underneath. If a house is built according to any national codes, you will have more than enough support to hold that size tank
 
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