Using a Freshwater tank for Saltwater

rainsong

New member
I am new to saltwater tanks.

I have a 150 gallon acrylic tank that I am currently using as a freshwater planted tank. I am in the process of taking the tank down to convert it to a saltwater tank.

Are there any special cleaning/disinfecting tips? Or any special DOs and DONTs?

Thanks!
 

Anemone

Cloning Around
Staff member
RC Mod
Premium Member
No, not really.

Other than, "Don't scratch it!" :lol:

Seriously, simple cleaning with water should suffice, but if you are worried, you can use a 10% bleach solution soak, then rinse, then air dry.

Kevin

Kevin
 

kfisc

Well-known member
People do this pretty often. The main concern is whatever treatment (especially those with copper) you had been using in the freshwater tank may have left residue. But a rinse with a water and bleach solution (light on the bleach, like a capful for a gallon or so) and drying it well should do the trick.


You were probably planning that, anyway. Some rinse further with RODI just to be extra cautious.

Good luck!
 

Michael Hoaster

Registered Seaweedist
Premium Member
Welcome to RC, rainsong!

As stated above, there's not much to do, switching over to saltwater. Just a basic cleaning.

I have bounced back and forth with fresh and saltwater versions of my acrylic 180 gallon tank. Currently, I'm running a Planted Saltwater setup, combining what I learned from both sides of the hobby. My thread, "Weeds", down in the Macro Algae Section may interest you. Come by and check it out. Here's a taste:


picture.php
 

Sk8r

Staff member
RC Mod
Things you will (ideally) need: a downflow box, partitioned sump, skimmer, heater, autotopoff with reservoir, refractometer, various hoses, hose clamps, and good tests for alkalinity, calcium, and magnesium. Re metals, salt water is very aggressive with all metals except noble metals and aluminum, so no hose clamps underwater, no copper (poison), and you do have the choice between a submerged vs non-submerged pump. You can look up all of these. Most spendy things are your skimmer, pump, and sump, but you CAN use an ordinary aquarium as your sump, gluing in partitions that give you room for your skimmer, and a way to keep any moss you might have in your sump (or stray fish) from getting into your pump. For skimmers, the most efficent ones produce a fine foam, and sit in the sump. Since they have a habit of overflowing under some conditions, this is not a bad thing.
 

Fiish

New member
Excellent size to start in saltwater, the bigger the better, by the way, if you are thinking of placing canisters as filtration for salt water you better forget that idea, a sump is ideal, it's also quite fun to configure and put it on going.
 

rainsong

New member
Things you will (ideally) need: a downflow box, partitioned sump, skimmer, heater, autotopoff with reservoir, refractometer, various hoses, hose clamps, and good tests for alkalinity, calcium, and magnesium. Re metals, salt water is very aggressive with all metals except noble metals and aluminum, so no hose clamps underwater, no copper (poison), and you do have the choice between a submerged vs non-submerged pump. You can look up all of these. Most spendy things are your skimmer, pump, and sump, but you CAN use an ordinary aquarium as your sump, gluing in partitions that give you room for your skimmer, and a way to keep any moss you might have in your sump (or stray fish) from getting into your pump. For skimmers, the most efficent ones produce a fine foam, and sit in the sump. Since they have a habit of overflowing under some conditions, this is not a bad thing.


Excellent information"¦. Thanks!!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Sk8r

Staff member
RC Mod
One other thing---evaporation is a good thing in saltwater if you're keeping corals, because you can put a calcium supplement in your topoff (fresh) water, and the evaporation rate keeps it feeding in via the autotopoff. My 50 gallon tank evaps a gallon a day. This does mean you need a lot of very pure fresh water including your very first fill, because the list of bad things in the water we drink is extensive, and evaporation causes buildup of those things in the aquarium. To produce water this pure, get a 4-cylinder ro/di filter (check our sponsors) and use that for your topoff. It strips out everything but the H's and O's in H2O.
 

rainsong

New member
So far, I have ordered a Lifereef SVS2-24 skimmer and purchased a used BRS 6-stage RO/DI. I plan to order a baffle kit for my 40 gallon breeder.

Thanks for the good info.
 

BigDave

Premium Member
The hardest part about making the switch is figuring out how to get the water to the sump.

Most of the people I know that swapped either drilled, or had their tank drilled for a BeanAnimal overflow. It worked well for me when I had my saltwater tank running.

I went the other way recently and went back to freshwater. My latest house doesn't have the room for the larg 120 gallon Cube'd reef I used to run.
 

SantaMonica

Active member
I recently sold a Maxcap 180 that was ten years old, with the high-rejection rate membrane option, and it was still outputting .002
 
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