water changes and septic systems?

jnfallon

New member
Ok, rainy spring here, and only a few feet above the water table.

Needless to say, the septic is less than happy.

I'm reading around today and come to find out that sodium is HORRIBLE for leech fields. Apparently it combines with clay particles to form an impermeable barrier.

Considering I go through about 80g/week of water, and it all goes down the drain, I'm thinking I better come up with a better solution, pronto.

I'm reading about adding calcium polysulphide to rejuvenate lost permeability, so any info on that would be great.

Otherwise, what the heck am I going to do with 4000g of salt water/year?
 

jnfallon

New member
Thanks BillyBeau, thats where I got the idea. :)

Still, what do people do about adding salt to septic leech fields? It seems like its completelt desctructive, but I bet half of us are on septic.

I dont even have gutters/storm drains on my street.

Boomer? I need help buddy.
 

Henry Bowman

Reefing since '87
You should find a guy here on RC that goes by ADesertRat. He is in the waste water and water purification business. I'll see if I can PM him to take a look at this thread...
 

jnfallon

New member
Yes, tim, and they're grumpy.

Seriously though, what are people doing about dumping huge amounts of sodium into their leech field?

Are we all just crossing our fingers:?
 

AZDesertRat

In Memoriam
I am talking with some of the environmental gurus I work with to get their take on this. Indication is its not a major problem but most testing has been done on houses with water softeners that flow brine to waste and not salt water aquariums. It is common knowledge that elevated sodium levels are a common problem at municipally owned treatment works as are endocrine disruptors or synthetic hormones and other drugs.

I will post more as I get info.
 

AZDesertRat

In Memoriam
I have not come across anything specific to salt water aquariums and septic systems but everything I have seen and heard on water softeners and septic systems is encouraging. Here is a link to a very good article on the subject:

http://www.caitechnologies.com/wate...ater-softener-discharge-on-septic-systems.htm

I have also seen studies done by the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) and the University of Wisconsin that suggest sodium is not as detrimental as some believe. I am researching past studies by the American WaterWorks Assn. and the Water Environment Federation for more info.
 

jnfallon

New member
Thanks again. Ive been having issues with the cesspools and definately dont want to make anything worse if I can help it.
 

ziac

New member
I have installed many septic tank systems and multi flow type single house sewage break down systems. It is recomended to bypass the tank and run water softner discharge into the leach feild and no to run it into the tank the only consern is the brine water upset the anrobic action in the tank. Too much salt water slows down the process of breaking down the solids and has been known to kill the enzymes in the tank which leades to haveing to have your tank pumped more offen and lowers the effinecy of the system. We useally install a bypass line from the house around the tank to the leach feild on a new system so they have a place to run the brine from the water softner. For coustomers who i have installed a water softner that have existing septic systems I suggest they boost the enzime in the tank every couple mounths to combat any problems they might have. You can buy enzyms from any septic tank installer or you can do it the old fasion way and just add a packet of yeast from the store one a mounth just flush it down the toilet. You can also get the enzyme from a septic tank pumping company. They useally put in a bottle after they pump out the system. If you are conserened about your system I would get a bottle dump it in and them just toss in some yeast once a mounth.
 
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