what is a good size QT tank to get

saltyESQ

New member
as I am preparing my 210g I need a good qt tank for all the new fish.

while I currently have a 90g, once I get the 210 up and running I will be selling it.

what is the smallest qt I should buy, my fish that I plan to purchase are:
1 young adult emperor angel
1 naso tang (about 4 inches)
1 sailfin tang (about 4 inches)
 

IsaaX

New member
If it were me, I'd probably go with a 40g with a few large pieces of PVC for hiding places. That's what I'm going to do.
 

DRC69

Oh Well
I had a 10 gallon.
One fish at a time no problem.
I had a blue tang about that size in there for about a month or so.
He was find with it.
 

supernareg

New member
ya, i wouldnt go larger than a 20 long (more swimming space) than the high 1.... cause they're only gonna be there for a month. just have a 10-20 gal sump for more water volume and u'll be set
 

saltyESQ

New member
I already have a 100g sump. Whatever I buy will be just to qt all my fish and then I am going to sell it. I was just worried about these fish as they all require a large space.
I don't want to cause undue stress and give them ich!
 

818

New member
Stress doesnt cause ich.

Sad to say but my neighbor has a 8 inch Naso Tang in a 45g for almost 3 years. He has never gotten ich. Though he has black splotches on his skin 24/7.
 

TearDrop

In Memoriam
I disagree. I think stress is definitely a cause for ich. Just like people, when we are stressed or tired we are more susceptible to getting sick. It's the same with fish.

Anyways, I would recommend a 40 gallon. I think it's larger for the 3 fishes where they would start harrassing each and it's small enough that you maintain relatively easily. Good luck.
 

Fmellish

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=8124210#post8124210 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by My F1sh R D34D!
Stress doesnt cause ich.

Sad to say but my neighbor has a 8 inch Naso Tang in a 45g for almost 3 years. He has never gotten ich. Though he has black splotches on his skin 24/7.

What most experts agree on is the theory that stress reduces an animals immune response, thus allowing parasites to take hold.

In the wild fish can live with parasites to no detrmient to the host. In confined captive environments, these parasites can become problematic.

Josh
 
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