What kind of drain system to use on a coast to coast style overflow?

nivram

New member
I purchase a tank that came with a coast to coast style overflow box. Originally I was thinking of going with a bean animal type drain. However the overflow box I have is not wide enough to install PVC elbows on the interior side of the bulk heads. I could just build a new overflow box, however I'd like to explore any other possible solutions.

Any tips or suggestions are appreciated.
 

Snausy

New member
When I hear "coast to coast" I immediately think of a BEANANIMAL drain system.

Problem is I have a Herbie and while I know the Herbie inside and out, I have not researched the beananimal enough to start talking to you about it and what it needs.

Not sure if the space problems you have with not fitting elbows will kill the deal or not but maybe someone else can talk to you about the beananimal.

There are only two truly "quiet' drain systems out there that I know of. The Herbie and the beananimal. With a coast to coast I'd definately set up the latter.
 

BillHicok

New member
It is possible to trim down the elbows to help with narrower overflows, I guess it just depends on how narrow it is.
 

nivram

New member
Yes my current overflow dimensions pretty much kills the bean animal setup. My coast to coast will be internal.

I've attached a photo with a 2" pvc elbow to give an idea of the inside dimensions.

It has three 1.5" holes. This will go on a 240g aquarium. Return pump will be a reeflo dart if this helps.
 

dwolson2

New member
I would remake the overflow if you had to or modify a elbow. Keep the bean animal if you can. I have had three tanks with it, and when snails have clogged my plumbing, I haven't walked home to a mess.
 

nivram

New member
It is possible to trim down the elbows to help with narrower overflows, I guess it just depends on how narrow it is.

I suppose I could cut off a panel and partially install the bulkheads and elbows. My only concern with that is if I ever needed to remove the bulkhead, I'd have to cut an reflux it again.

I'm looking at the possibility of building a new coast to coast out if glass.
 

dwolson2

New member
I wouldn't use glass, I would get abs plastic from the local shop. I did that with mine, and it was a lot easier and looked way better! I even had them bend it for me.
 

Daimyo68

Active member
What's you gph roughly going to be after headloss? Most likely, you will not need a full coast to coast in your tank, saving you real-estate.

For argument's sake, lets say you have 2000gph after headloss (which is way overkill imo). You would need a minimum of 30" of linear overflow. So to be on the safe side of being silent, figure in the BeanAnimal drain system with the 1" bulkheads and elbows and your internal overflow should be roughly 30" x 3" x 4" to be quite and efficient. That gives you 36" of linear overflow, which will allow a thin layer of water from surface to flow over the weir.

Obviously, the more linear area, the quieter it will be, but at the cost of having a larger overflow "box" in the tank. With 36", you should be dead silent. The water flowing over the lip will only be dropping roughly 1.5", it's literally nothing.

I've built all of mine using 1/4" glass and had/have no issues. The latest one (75g) is in my albums, along with my first one (50g), in which I did do a full C2C, and later found out it wasn't necessary.

Image below is just for reference. Total linear overflow is 30"

overflow.jpg
 

dwolson2

New member
I've built all of mine using 1/4" glass and had/have no issues. The latest one (75g) is in my albums, along with my first one (50g), in which I did do a full C2C, and later found out it wasn't necessary.

Image below is just for reference. Total linear overflow is 30"

I also used the 1/4" glass on one, and It was more difficult to build then abs, and you must buy smoked glass(which I didn't) So when I painted the glass, overtime the black paint chipped away. Also, the glass was more expensive. Just a few reasons why I suggested ABS:debi:
 

Daimyo68

Active member
I did mine in clear glass. Smoked is an option, but since my back glass is painted black, I went with clear and just painted the elbows black.

At one point, I glued GSP to the overflow and just let it spread. It was covering it nicely until I moved, and took it off for the trip. On my latest one, I glued a piece of Orange Monticap on it. It's making it's was across it now.

Either way, Acrylic or Glass, it's a great setup.
 

dwolson2

New member
I did mine in clear glass. Smoked is an option, but since my back glass is painted black, I went with clear and just painted the elbows black.

At one point, I glued GSP to the overflow and just let it spread. It was covering it nicely until I moved, and took it off for the trip. On my latest one, I glued a piece of Orange Monticap on it. It's making it's was across it now.

Either way, Acrylic or Glass, it's a great setup.
I have though about putting GSP on my overflow. Do you mind posting up a picture(if the OP doesn't Mind)

OP I would say do it right, while you can. once there is water in the tank you are not going to change it. Unless some disaster happens, in which case you will be mad at yourself for not fixing it when you had the chance.
 

nivram

New member
What's you gph roughly going to be after headloss? Most likely, you will not need a full coast to coast in your tank, saving you real-estate.

For argument's sake, lets say you have 2000gph after headloss (which is way overkill imo). You would need a minimum of 30" of linear overflow. So to be on the safe side of being silent, figure in the BeanAnimal drain system with the 1" bulkheads and elbows and your internal overflow should be roughly 30" x 3" x 4" to be quite and efficient. That gives you 36" of linear overflow, which will allow a thin layer of water from surface to flow over the weir.

Obviously, the more linear area, the quieter it will be, but at the cost of having a larger overflow "box" in the tank. With 36", you should be dead silent. The water flowing over the lip will only be dropping roughly 1.5", it's literally nothing.

I've built all of mine using 1/4" glass and had/have no issues. The latest one (75g) is in my albums, along with my first one (50g), in which I did do a full C2C, and later found out it wasn't necessary.

Image below is just for reference. Total linear overflow is 30"

overflow.jpg

I'm looking at about 2000 gph. I plan to run two 1" sea swirls off the return as well as two BRS media reactors or two little Fishies.
 

nivram

New member
I did mine in clear glass. Smoked is an option, but since my back glass is painted black, I went with clear and just painted the elbows black.

At one point, I glued GSP to the overflow and just let it spread. It was covering it nicely until I moved, and took it off for the trip. On my latest one, I glued a piece of Orange Monticap on it. It's making it's was across it now.

Either way, Acrylic or Glass, it's a great setup.

That would be cool to see. Did the monti cap growth affect the water flow into the drain?
 

Lavoisier

Premium Member
...
For argument's sake, lets say you have 2000gph after headloss (which is way overkill imo). You would need a minimum of 30" of linear overflow. So to be on the safe side of being silent, figure in the BeanAnimal drain system with the 1" bulkheads and elbows and your internal overflow should be roughly 30" x 3" x 4" to be quite and efficient. That gives you 36" of linear overflow, which will allow a thin layer of water from surface to flow over the weir.

Daimyo, do you have the formula handy or do you have a link to it?
 
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