What padding to put under a rimless tank?

TauReef

New member
I ordered a custom rimless tank and I need some feedback on what padding to put under it. I have read that many people use foam insulation for this and even yoga mats? I have some styrofoam sheets from something that was shipped to me recently. Do you all think styrofoam would work alright or should I just get some of this foam insulation? What do you use?
 

Nanofreak79

New member
1/2" - 3/4" inch rigid foam from home depot is more than adequate.

This will not help if the top of the stand is not level. I like how people think that foam will somehow fill in imperfections in your stand. If your stand is true and level, a yoga mat or something such as drawer lining will suffice. Plus who wants an ugly sheet of pink foam sitting under there tank? I use the stuff back by the cabinet section at HD that's used for lining the inside of drawers. It's roughly 1/8" thick. The top of my stands are flat , so I could probably go without it as well.
 

uncleof6

New member
This will not help if the top of the stand is not level. I like how people think that foam will somehow fill in imperfections in your stand. If your stand is true and level, a yoga mat or something such as drawer lining will suffice. Plus who wants an ugly sheet of pink foam sitting under there tank? I use the stuff back by the cabinet section at HD that's used for lining the inside of drawers. It's roughly 1/8" thick. The top of my stands are flat , so I could probably go without it as well.

Excuse me, but I believe it is the tank manufacturer that determines what needs to be under the tank, and what does not need to be under the tank. If the MANUFACTURER says 1/8" is fine, then use it. If they say 3" thick foam rubber, with bobble heads around the rim, then that would be the thing to do , regardless of whether you can make stands that are perfect or not--that is hardly the issue anyway--if you want the builder to pay for the damage if the tank fails.

The use of a material under the tank, is to alleviate possible point loading that will break the bottom panel..........and in all cases can be considered a requirement for rimless glass tanks, that do not have a full floated bottom panel.

I don't believe any mention was made of the OP's stand not being level, or twisted, non co-planer or any other issue. If these were the problem he was trying to solve, I would have already admonished the OP that foam would not be the solution to those problem.
 

Nanofreak79

New member
Then why make a blanket statement?:headwally: I never said his stand was out of plane, level etc. just gave examples.
 
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uncleof6

New member
Then why make a blanket statement?:headwally:

Most commonly used which is basically what the OP asked...............1/2 being most common from the tank manufacturers..... I do not wish to engage in another petty argument. What prompted my response was the assumption of what I may think, otherwise I would have ignored your post. If I misinterpreted your post, then I apologize, however this is not the first time. :)
 
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TauReef

New member
Ya guys, I was just wondering what most people use. I am not trying to correct for an unlevel stand (my stand is just fine). I just know I should put something on the bottom of the tank to help distribute to weight and not put too much pressure and any one point. I will use the 1/2 rigid foam that you suggested uncleof6 unless the manufacturer says differently when I pick the tank up. Thanks.
 

uncleof6

New member
Ya guys, I was just wondering what most people use. I am not trying to correct for an unlevel stand (my stand is just fine). I just know I should put something on the bottom of the tank to help distribute to weight and not put too much pressure and any one point. I will use the 1/2 rigid foam that you suggested uncleof6 unless the manufacturer says differently when I pick the tank up. Thanks.

That would be the best plan.
 

Nanofreak79

New member
Most commonly used which is basically what the OP asked...............1/2 being most common from the tank manufacturers..... I do not wish to engage in another petty argument. What prompted my response was the assumption of what I may think, otherwise I would have ignored your post. If I misinterpreted your post, then I apologize, however this is not the first time. :)

No arguments here, I just thought some elaboration would be helpful. And I'm sorry you find it hard to interpret my posts. To the op, I suggest you go right to your manufacturer to avoid any issues with warranties an such. Good luck on your new tank!
 

96slowbra

New member
i just bought some anti-fatigue pad from harbor freight. comes in little squares that you can hook together. i hear it holds up better over time when water is involved
 

NanoReefWanabe

New member
i just bought some anti-fatigue pad from harbor freight. comes in little squares that you can hook together. i hear it holds up better over time when water is involved

holds up better then what?

pink rigid insulation is made for below grade use, at least the stuff i use (celfort200) you dont want soft spongy stuff under the tank anyway. celfort is high density Polystyrene, basically as hard as plywood. as a landscaper i have dug up sheets of HDPS insulation that have been buried for 20 years that have no signs of water damage to them.

soft anti-fatigue mats have open cells and can hold and store water which can lead to mold issues, and certainly anything that absorbs water wont hold up as long as something that doesnt.
 

Fish Junction

New member
Just for the record, if your stand has a bow or you decide to place your tank on a solid wood stand or for that matter plywood or pressed board of any kind, wood will and usually does twist and warp to some degree especially if it gets wet. Styrofoam and styrene sheets will provide a stable flat base that will adjust regardless of whats under it as long as the irregularity is not larger than the foam is thick. As stated above do not use a material that will absorb water like anti-fatigue mats, even the cheap white styrofoam will work

The styrofoam/styrene is to make sure the tank is evenly supported, not to level the stand.
 
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96slowbra

New member
holds up better then what?

pink rigid insulation is made for below grade use, at least the stuff i use (celfort200) you dont want soft spongy stuff under the tank anyway. celfort is high density Polystyrene, basically as hard as plywood. as a landscaper i have dug up sheets of HDPS insulation that have been buried for 20 years that have no signs of water damage to them.

soft anti-fatigue mats have open cells and can hold and store water which can lead to mold issues, and certainly anything that absorbs water wont hold up as long as something that doesnt.

I have 1" under my tank now, but I have been cautioned against it. But I am tagging along because I'm starting my build now too. I think if I stick with hard foam I will switch to 1/2"....

IMG_00000014.jpg
 
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Cobraden

New member
I like using the pink insulation panels. Easy to fit in place and cut. Did a great job when i used it under a 300 gal that I had.
 

TauReef

New member
Update: I did a leak test with my tank on the stand in the spot in the house where the tank will be without any foam. After a couple of days I checked out how the tank was sitting on the stand. Two sides were completely flush whereas two sides have a 3-4in space where I can slide a piece of paper under. This means that the sides and part of the middle of the tank is not sitting flush. Knowing this I am going to get a 1/2'' polystyrene board from HD to help the tank sit more evenly. I think this has to do with imperfections in the stand but probably is mainly the result of my floor not being level. We are talking about a fraction of a mm here, but I guess that is all it takes to crack.
 

Subw00er

New member
I use a dresser as my tank stand for my rimless. I didnt want to use the ugly Home Depot stuff when I paid good money for the look of a rimless. I put down a piece of plexiglass which I thought would allow the tank to move slightly if needed and on top of that I used a 1/8" thick piece of foam. Its actually a tool chest liner from harbor freight. Its good quality and has worked well over the last year. I cut the plexi and foam slightly larger than my tank to catch drips down the side of the tank - which works well because the foam is compressed ever so slightly, the drips down go over the edge and ruin my dresser.

Here are a couple pics.
7365489514_361b6ac99f_b.jpg

7348314828_87425b9244_b.jpg
 

Subw00er

New member
I use a dresser as my tank stand for my rimless. I didnt want to use the ugly Home Depot stuff when I paid good money for the look of a rimless. I put down a piece of plexiglass which I thought would allow the tank to move slightly if needed and on top of that I used a 1/8" thick piece of foam. Its actually a tool chest liner from harbor freight. Its good quality and has worked well over the last year. I cut the plexi and foam slightly larger than my tank to catch drips down the side of the tank - which works well because the foam is compressed ever so slightly, the drips down go over the edge and ruin my dresser.

Here are a couple pics.
7348314828_87425b9244_b.jpg

7365489514_361b6ac99f_b.jpg


The tank is a Mr Aqua 48g rimless.
 

TauReef

New member
Because I am talking about a fraction of a mm (enough to fit one piece of paper under but not two) I think it is a question of weight being distributed evenly versus a bad stand I hope. I will be buying a big sheet of 3/4'' polystyrene foam and putting it under the tank once I get it drained. It is not a huge tank so it is not a big project.

Thanks for all your comments and keep posting here on your experiences with rimless tanks and padding. I will try and update this thread on my experiences.
 

TauReef

New member
Update: I took the water out and placed a piece of 3/4'' rigid polystyrene under the tank. Again, this was to even out the top of the stand and compensate for a fraction of a mm uneven spot on the tank. I left a couple of inches on each side of the board to trim later after the tank settles on it. First observations are that the tank is sitting a little more even and a tiny bit more level. As I mentioned before the floor sloped a bit so I had about a 1/4'' more water on the front of the tank as I did than the back. I think this will work out just fine. I will wait a couple of weeks to reserve judgement as to how this will work but it seems like a good long term solution at the moment.
 
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