whats the deal w/nems??

Laura8088

New member
Hey all,

So really, How perfect does ones water quality really need to be to keep an anemone successfully? I have heard some people say nems like nitrates around 5-10ppm, and others say they cant thrive unless water quality is absolutly perfect.

1. what are acceptable levels for nems.
2. Whats the hardiest/ best nem for biginners
3. what are the absolute no no's for keeping nem's
 

Leviathanth

New member
I would like to know this stuff as well, considering that I am just starting my anemone journey. That said:

1: Anemone's level is OVER 9000!!
2: Aiptasia.
3: Don't step on them.
 

Laura8088

New member
lol let me re-phrase:reading:

1. levels meaning nitrates, phosphates, calcium, alk so on and so fourth
2. Aiptasia are pest nems, I ment any nem except those :wildone:
 

Leviathanth

New member
I know, I was being silly.

1: As far s I know nitrates and phosphates should be low to zero. Calcium should be in the 400s. And Alk should be 8-12dKh if I am not confused.

2: Supposedly bubble tip anemones are fairly resilient.

Keep in mind, that as I mentioned in my first post, I know only what I have read. I have 1 day worth of experience so far. So really I am interested in hearing from someone more experienced as well.
 

Laura8088

New member
okie dokie guess you and I will be waiting on the bench for someone experienced with nems to show us the ropes
 

SwampyBill

New member
While some nems like LTA's & bubble-tips are hardier than others (carpets), it's still suggested to let a tank mature for at least 6 months before adding an anemone, because they can't tolerate the fluctuating chemistries in a new tank. In that time, concentrate on keeping near perfect water parameters. I've had LTA's, RBTA's, sebae's & 2 carpet nems over the last 12 yrs, & all require near perfect water chemistries & very good lighting. Good luck & welcome to Reef Central.
 

Kaman8

New member
I think the best thing is keep all your parameters stable. Anemones defiantly don't like parameters swings. I have bubble tip and haddoni carpet in my tank and they are all thriving. My parameters are always stable at

Ph 8
Ammonia 0
Nitrite 0
Nitrate 3
Phosphate 0
Calcium 470
Kh 8,5
Magnesium 1320
 

Reefahholic

New member
If I were you guys, I would try a Haitian reef anemone/ Pink tipped condy. Although not a host anemone, it is hardy, cheap, available just about anywhere, and beautiful. Good luck, and welcome to the addiction. :)

overview
The Haitian Reef Anemone, also known as the Pink-Tip Condy, is found near Haiti, in lagoons or on inner reefs, as individuals, or loose groups. It is never found in connected clusters. It has a red column with long, tapering, pink-tipped tentacles. The tentacles may occasionally develop a bubble-like appearance. Generally it likes to bury the base in the sand or into the crevice of a rock for protection.
The Haitian Reef Anemone requires strong light and should never be purchased if a good lighting system is not in place. It will do well in an aquarium with live rock and several crustaceans. Although an Anemone requires a reef environment, it is not the best suited for the reef aquarium. The Haitian Reef Anemone moves around the tank and has a sting that can inflict grave damage to other anemones and corals. Do not include its natural predators such as the Red-Leg Hermit Crab. Unlike other anemones, the Haitian Reef Anemone does not have a relationship with any particular fish, and it is rare for any type of clownfish or damsel to reside within them.

The diet should include feedings of fish, mussels, shrimp, or other foods of this type.

 

OrionN

Moved on
there are anemones and then there are ANEMONES. If you are new, then go for some of the easiier to keep ones.
The Anemone FAQ go into which anemone are easier and which are harder. What they required
 

Reefahholic

New member
thanks everyone!

What would you say would be the max nitrates a BTA could safely handle.

You know i haven't checked my water parameters in over 2 years.

I do frequent water changes, run carbon and gfo, have cheato, rock rubble and marine pure block in the sump. I also stir my sand weekly and use IO Reef Crystals salt. Everything thrives...
 

Laura8088

New member
thats freeking awesome!!!

I would like to hear from some others on their nitrate levels they have with BTA's. . . anyone else care to share??
 

TinManx

New member
thanks everyone!

What would you say would be the max nitrates a BTA could safely handle.

Why do you want high nitrates? What are your nitrates now?

The goal should be to keep the healthiest possible environment for your pets, not to keep the worst survivable conditions possible. I don't think that the numbers matter as much as the health of the tank ... but if nitrates can't be kept under reasonable control I wouldn't add any anemones, or corals, because the tank ain't healthy.
 

Laura8088

New member
Why do you want high nitrates? What are your nitrates now?

The goal should be to keep the healthiest possible environment for your pets, not to keep the worst survivable conditions possible. I don't think that the numbers matter as much as the health of the tank ... but if nitrates can't be kept under reasonable control I wouldn't add any anemones, or corals, because the tank ain't healthy.

I do not want high nitrates, I simply had heard some people say that nems like water with some nitrates, and then on the other hand I have heard people say water quality had to be pristine. . . I mentioned nothing about wanting them to be high, and I have no intentions of getting an anemone until I feel comfortable. My tank is a year and a half old. My nitrates are currently around 5ppm. I know there are plenty of people on RC that have nems and all I wanted was a bunch of feed back on differnt peoples experiences.
 

Pinkskunk

New member
i have some large live rocks from my display tank. I also have a 40 gallon breeder sitting around collecting dirt.

one day i needed some room in my main tank so i removed my 2 giganteas. i put them in the 40 breeder along with the live rock i removed from the display tank. fill it with completely new water i made the night before. they have been in there for almost 9 months, it's supposed to be a temporary setup but i got lazy and lazy....... 9 months passed....

the negative effect it has on the tank is ALGAE, they start to grow fast and furious. so i get a yellow tang and throw it in there, the yellow tang wipe out the entire hair algae population, clean the heater and rocks and all.....now the tank is maintenance free. lol i take it back, i have to change the water maybe every 3 weeks? sometime i do 80% water change, sometime i do 50% change.

tank definately look neglected but the nems are doing just fine. no better or no worse then they were in the main system.
 

MacWilliams

New member
5ppm is not much at all. You will be fine with that. If I get lazy and dont do water changes my Nitrates are stable at 20ppm and my BTA / LTA are very healthy. Your tanks age and your nitrates are good for an anemone IMO/IME. Good luck with whatever you choose but LTA / BTA are the pretty easy.
 

Mael

New member
My rainbow BTA has been in my DT for about 2 months now or so, my nitrates stay between 0 and 5ish, phos is usually 0, nitrites are always 0. It seems to be quite happy although my clowns havent seemed to notice it yet, eats krill and mysis right now until I go buy something a little bigger for it.

That said I have seen a cpl BTA's in a locals frag tank and his nitrates were darn near 40 and the BTA's still looked healthy, I would never suggest letting your nitrates get that high ever but it seems to work for him. Besides his levels being high they are very very stable so that may be a bigger factor in the end. I didnt get my BTA from him but all the frags from the same tank have done great.
 

garygb

New member
I fortunately have been able to keep the nitrates undetectable since removing the sand bed a few years ago, skimming constantly and allowing some algae to grow in select areas. I've had the same anemones for years, and they have experienced high nitrates (once up to 60ppm), but they were not happy of course. I have noticed that even low levels of nitrate causes anemones to shift around, for example, my magnificas in the past would move move a cm or so when there was detectable nitrate. Since getting the nitrates under control by removal of a sand bed, they sit still.

Other conditions to aim for besides undetectable nitrates: sg 1.026-1.027, temp 80-82, good water flow and reef quality lighting. I don't believe anemones care about Ca at all. I don't test phosphates, so I can't speak to that.
 
Top