zoa dip chemistry question

surfnvb7

Premium Member
i got a question for you guys who have the PH meters, as I dont have one (at least not anymore )

i dont really have a pH test kit either, never saw the use for one really now that i'm used to keeping a reef, and i have an eye for how things are supposed to be.

but anyways, what i want to know, is in order to prepare this zoa dip (which i have done many times before with a pH meter, so i'm not a total newb at this), you have to get the pH set to 8.2....

what chemical are you adding to the RO/DI water to get the pH raised up to 8.2?

and, how much of this chemical are you adding per gallon of RO/DI to get the pH up to 8.2?

the reason i ask, is again, b/c i have no pH testing equipment. so i'm hoping someone can point me in the right direction on this.

if i had a pH meter, trust me, being a chemistry nerd, i'd just figure it out myself :lol:


i think sometimes i havent even bothered with the pH and the zoa dip turned out fine. but coming up here on trading season, i want to make sure things are done perfectly right to minimize stress on the zoas ;)
 

FLIPbmw

New member
I think people are using sea chem reef buffer to 8.3 or what ever it states on the bottle.

A pinch of that stuff in a bucket of R/O or tap water will be sufficient.

I remember using that stuff when I worked at a fish store, doing FW dips to sick hippo tangs, all you need is a gram or two.

Baking soda will work, but I never managed to get the pH up high with out adding a lotttt of it.
 

surfnvb7

Premium Member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=7557037#post7557037 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by FLIPbmw
I think people are using sea chem reef buffer to 8.3 or what ever it states on the bottle.

A pinch of that stuff in a bucket of R/O or tap water will be sufficient.

I remember using that stuff when I worked at a fish store, doing FW dips to sick hippo tangs, all you need is a gram or two.

Baking soda will work, but I never managed to get the pH up high with out adding a lotttt of it.

crap, i was hoping i could find a bare chemical i could add. anyone know what the active ingredient in sea chem reef buffer is? being that it is a buffer, i would think its the same as baking soda...?

baking soda is out of the question, i've tried that little experiment back when i had my pH meter, by the time the pH was at 8.2, the dkH was off the scale :lol:
 
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