Cirolanid Isopod

fareforce

Premium Member
I was just looking at my tank when I noticed a Cirolanid Isopod. I got him out, but when there is one, there is usually others right??

So, how do I get rid of these things? My tank is fully stocked with corals, fish, all sorts of stuff..

Please help!!
 

jay24k

New member
I haven't seen much other then getting them out at night when attached to the fish.

Only 3 ways to get rid of it.

Manually and then the fish really should be moved to QT to be treated.

Remove all fish till they starve and die off.

Nuke the tank - Remove all rock and sand as they can hide in the rock. Cure the rock in a VAT for awhile till they die off.

Hopefully you only had one.
 

fareforce

Premium Member
how will I know? He wasn't attached to a fish, and all of my fish seem fine. I actually found him attached to a pack of Algone in my overflow.
 

sassyfishy

New member
Are you sure it was a Cirolanid and not a harmless Sphaeromatid Isopod? (I've had both in my tank, so it was somewhat easy for me to tell them apart).

I was lucky... I noticed mine before anything was in the tank. I netted them out manually with a brine shrimp net and flashlight about an hour after lights out - and checked the refugium daily (somehow a lot of them ended up there) for the first two months. I captured about 30 in all (within the first three weeks) and haven't seen any since. I did not add any fish until a whole month had passed without finding any.

I still see the occasional sphaeromatid (they are attracted to sinking pellet food). They look almost exactly like the cirolanid minus the huge eyes, and they can swim lightning fast.

Good luck - and here's to hoping you've got sphaeromatids, not cirolanids.
 

Pandora

Premium Member
Agreed with sassy. Other types of isopods are more common. Do not go by appearance alone unless you are pretty confident of your invert ID skills... maybe you could take a pic and post it?
 

JRPhd

New member
So, it appears that if they roll into a ball, they're safe. If they don't, then they can be "evil" and squash them with the hopes of making few Type II errors?

Jon
 

fareforce

Premium Member
Ok, here are the pics. So is it what I thought it was? It is about 3/8"+ long

Side View:
thing.JPG


Bottom View:
thing2.JPG
 

sassyfishy

New member
Having had both in my tank - I'd say yours sure looks like a Cirolanid. The big eyes are what lead me to saying so. The sphaeromatids have much smaller eyes, in my experience.
 

75Gallons

New member
I've kept these in a tank along with hermits and a blenny and my blenny used to eat them. I think isopods get a bad name but their not the unstoppable parasites people make them out to be.
 

fareforce

Premium Member
Do I need to remove my fish?

I have never seen one attached to a fish, and all of my fish apppear to be healthy with no marks or scars on them. I was up all night last night looking in my tank with a red flashlight, and didn't see any more.. there is just that one that I found.

Could this just have been a fluke? I did just add a new piece of coral to my tank. Would it have come in from that?
 

75Gallons

New member
Well if there were adults in there then you'll probably see some very small ones in there in a month or so but for now I wouldn't waste the energy of moving the fish and stressing them out. If you get any sign that the fish are being harmed though move them as quickly as possible. In the meantime relax and enjoy your tank.;)
 

sassyfishy

New member
If this was happening to me, I'd simply observe. Since you've not had any sightings of parasites attached to fish or sores on your fish - the chances may be good that you won't. Keep an eye on the tank for the next while. Wait until about an hour after lights out and use a red lens flashlight to observe the fish and check along the substrate and especially lower 1/3 area of your tank along rocks, etc., for the pests. If you don't see any after a month or so, and you don't see any evidence of sores on your fish, then I'd personally not be too concerned.
 
Top