Crocea in an AP24?

AS11423

In Memoriam
Is it doable? If so, what precautions, care measures etc should I take to provide for a healthy specimen?

PS> The Crocea in question is about 2 inches, and oh my gawd what a beauty!!


TIA.
 

cherubfish pair

New member
It is the smallest of the tridacna's so should be doable. I would like to know more of their feeding habits, I hear some ppl don't add filter-feeder feed and just rely on the fish poop and other things suspended in the water to feed them.
 

everl0ng

New member
i have one in my 37g column tank which is 20'' deep x 20'' wide x 24'' tall. it is on the sand at the very bottom and i only use a 150w sunpod hqi. it is doing very well and it must be happy where it is at because it doesn't shoot around the tank. i add marine snow every other day, but i feed shrimp, clams, mussels, lobster, crab, nori, and squid all blended up, and all of my livestock goes crazy for it.
 

agoutihead

New member
i dont think the minimum is 150w of halides, you can successfully keep croceas and maxmias with the 70w sunpod halide.

but hes got PC, so thats bad all together.
 

SugarFox03

Animal Behaviorist
In that size tank, I don't think a crocea would do well over an extended period of time with a 70w. It would have to be very close to the surface, at which point is useless to have the clam since they are best viewed looking straight down.
 

agoutihead

New member
im going to try both a maxima and a crocea in an 11 gallon nano with a 70w. i dont foresee any problems.

why dont you think it wouldnt last long?

70w of MH is plenty for a clam that is under 4"... especially if you are dosing with phytoplankton.

gotta cover both bases.
 

oldreefer76

New member
70w MH is to low even in a 11g I would never try a Maxima or Crocea with less than 150W and Clams Do Not need Phyto !!! 99% of there food comes from converting light into energy to live the other 1% is filter feeding available nutrients in the water column, I have kept many clams over the years and even in a 10g on the bottom with 175w MH it was reaching for light, why make such gorgeous animals suffer?
 

agoutihead

New member
when a clam is smaller, it needs both a good mixture of light and phytoplankton, it is not until they are much older do they rely mostly on light.

i personally feel people over kill on the lights more often than not. i would only use 150w on a 75 gallon reef. 150 w on a 11 gallon nano is way to much over kill. thats like putting 250w on a 55. its just not needed.

but to each his own, there is no need to argue. lets just agree to disagree i suppose.
 

Rosseau

New member
The Sun puts out a lot of light so to me it's a little harder to argue that people go overkill with lighting. I guess you can keep animals alive with less, so maybe this is the economical or at least more practical route.

The volume of water really has no effect on the amount of light the tank needs.

It's about the depth of water which the light has to penetrate. Concentrate more on this.
 

agoutihead

New member
so your telling me you cant burn corals with too much light? or have them too high up?

i read about this all the time when it comes to lighting. just face it, sometimes metal halides can be too intense on certain tanks. especially when you get up around the 250-400w on smaller tanks under 125.

and the depth of water does have alot to do with it, you are right. when i say a 70w mh its on a 13" tall cube. i think that is plenty shallow enough that a 70w will penetrate plenty in order to provide for maxima and croceas. dont forget, they also like to be on rock work instead of sand. maximas that is. sometimes even croceas.
 

Rosseau

New member
I don't personally know enough about their physiology to really comment on what is too much light for a clam or corals.

I feel like once acclimated you would be hard pressed to overkill a coral/clam with light.
 

agoutihead

New member
so youve never heard of a coral not opening because of too much light?

im not saying it happens in every case, but it does happen more often than we know about. would you put a 2 - 400w on a 75gallon then?
 

Rosseau

New member
I've heard of it for sure. I mean in the ocean, different corals will live in certain areas of the reef partially because of their light requirements - so yes... some like less light. Again, I don't really know enough about it.
 

agoutihead

New member
and thats alot of the problems with having a reef tank, things are taken from all over the world and all have different requirements, some require much more of one thing, while other require less of something else. its all about finding a middle ground, and yes there is middle ground on lighting as well.
 
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