cuttle hatchlings

Fishyfins

New member
ok, so me and my boss are setting up cuttle tanks. we are both very much aware of the conditions these creaturs need, and how to care for them and whatnot, but one thing we cant seem to find info on is specific behavior of cuttles right after they hatch.

i dont have my cuttle eggs yet (our distributer has two clutches of S. bandensis eggs on order for us), but i want to find out what behavior i should look for in my cuttles, to make sure they are in good health. will they be active right away? or will there be a period of rest/innactivity afterward, and if so, how long will this last before they become active. when should they start feeding (i plan to add a few live mysis to the breader net when the eggs go in, so they have a quick snack as soon as they feel ready).

also, just out of curiosity, what is a baby ceph called?
 

Paradox009

New member
Ive seen baby bandensis from different sources act very different. So different that I question if some were actually a different type. My first batches, I kept well in groups of 6-12 in one breeder net. A 2nd batch from a different source Ive observed an incredible canabolism rate. They almost needed to be isolated 1 to breeder! They are active when born, changing colors from white to a dark red. They may take a couple days to start eating, but often accept pods, mysis, and even small marine shrimp that are 4 times thier size! Again, I noticed only my first batch took on the marine shrimp at this age.

As newborns, they will not move around as much. Place some macro in with the breeder nets for them to rest in. I find that feeding them a small amount a couple times a day is better then flood feeding. This allows you to observe them eating to make sure they do.

As they grow larger and am more confident in aquiring food, they will become more active.
 

Opcn

New member
Feeding is very difficult, hope you have plenty of mysis and amphipods and the like.
 

Fishyfins

New member
there are loads in the vats at work, i just fish them out, i also have access to plenty of brine shrimp, and small crabs and the like
feeding shouldnt be a problem
 

DHyslop

New member
Skip the brine shrimp. I've never read of a single hatchling ceph--in the scientific literature or in the hobby--survive for more than a few days on artemia.

Dan
 
Top