D200 Tips

shaggydoo541

New member
Anyone have any tips from shooting a D200. The camera is actually my wifes but I would like to take some good pics of my tank. I need to get a macro lens for it as well because the 18-200 lens we have right now does not work very well. Any recommendations here?
 

gregr

New member
105mm micro lens by Nikon- it's sweet. I was using one today as a matter of fact. As far as tips, the settings are different for different subjects so let us know what you want to shoot, or post some examples and we can make recommendations.
 

shaggydoo541

New member
105mm micro lens. I'll take a look at it. I honestly haven't tried taking pictures of anything yet. But I'll try to snap a few and experiment around for a bit and then post some for some critique and advice. Thanks.
 

VoidRaven

'tis himself
Premium Member
Like gregr said, the lens is what really gives the performance with DSLR cameras like the D200. I've had my D200 for a couple years now and must say that I do love it. Nice, solid body...balances well with many lenses...lots of flexibility. Trying to get my wife to use it more as she wants to upgrade to the Fuji S5 from her current S2 (the new S5 is the same body as the D200).

Camera body is important, but not nearly as important as good glass. That 105mm Nikkor is supposed to be really sweet.
 

shaggydoo541

New member
Well I went to check out the 105mm and they didn't have any but they had some on order so when they get some in I'll have to try it out.

From past experience I have been able to shoot corals fairly well because I can setup a shot, turn off filtration and not worry about much. But the few times I've tried to get fish I have gotten blurry or otherwise lousy pictures.... any tips here? I've tried messing with the shutter speed etc but honeslty don't know enough about the camera to really be effective.... and my wife won't take the time to try cause she doesn't like my tank much ;)
 

Ebn

New member
You need a faster shutter speed to capture fish or anything moving for that matter. Try bumping it up to 1/100 or so and see how it does.
 

BlueCorn

Retired
Premium Member
Keep it dry. :D


I did a 4 day shoot in Yosemite earlier in the year. We had snow or rain for a portion of every day. Two D200s stopped working do to moisture problems.
 

IslandCrow

Reef Monkey
Premium Member
Use a tripod even when taking fish photos if you're not already. Even though you're moving the camera, the tripod helps reduce the shake you're going to get from hand holding the camera. Open up the aperture so you can increase the shutter speed. If you don't understand apertures, basically, you want a nice low f-stop (2.5-4.5). This will limit your depth of field (which may not always be acceptable), but it allows more light into the lens, which allows you to reduce the shutter speed. 1/100 shutter speed should be plenty to take pictures of most fish. The other way you can shoot at faster speeds is increasing the ISO (a.k.a. ASA). I'd go with 200 minimum, but you may need 400 or even 800 ISO to freeze your faster fish in frame. As you increase your ISO, your picture will become grainier, so play around with it a bit to get the right combination.
 

Ebn

New member
You'll need at least ISO 800 and a fast lens to freeze fish if you want to shoot w/available light. For instance, here are a couple of shots taken at the Long Beach Aquarium in SoCal w/the D200.

ISO 800, shutter 1/125, f/2.8
58293542.jpg


ISO 800, shutter 1/350, f/2
58293560.jpg


Unless the fish doesn't move, ditch the tripod.
 

shaggydoo541

New member
Ebn, those are great shots. I'll try the faster shutter speed with a higher iso. I thought I was opening up the aperature but will have to double check I really was. I still don't have a good lens yet... well the 18-200 nikon lens is actually a nice all purpose lens but it cant seem to get the closeups I want. But I'll keep playing around and will post some pics here as soon as I can get a computer to load them up at home.... my memory cards are getting really full ;)
 
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