HELP with Bryopsis and NOPOX

adamfajge

In Memoriam
I have had this bryopsis issue for at least 1.5 years. I have tried the Tech M with no success. I use the NOPOX to simply keep the nitrates at 0. But that still does not kill the byopsis. I run a Maxspect Razor about 18 inches over tank and run the light for 10 hrs with only 5 hours at 45 white and 75 blue. Other 5 hrs are ramping up and down. I cant take the few rocks that are bad out and scrub and boil them because they have corals attached. WOuld the Tan Sea Hare eat this green stuff? I can't think of any other solution. Manual removal does not work unless you completely kill the rock. I have about 40lbs of LR in my tank and about 40 LBs of LR in the sump that is bryopsis free. All paramaters are good. How about a fox face? WOuld it eat the bryopsis like a Sea Hare? I have a MP40 on side of tank. I have a serpent star and 3 turbo stars for my CUC. I feed normal amount of frozen every night. I am dosing 4 ml of NOPOX every morning and still get 0 nitrate and 0 reading of phosphate.
 

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ghostman

New member
Bryopsis can be very hard to beat. I would recommend keeping up with the Tech M as that worked for me and others in the past. Mg levels over 2000 are needed to kill bryopsis. The other thing to try could be a sea hare. Mine ate all algae, including bryopsis. I also did a lot of manual removal. gathering as much as I could. My fox face never touched the stuff, so I'm not sure about that. Good Luck.
 

Reef Frog

New member
NOPOX is a carbon source, right? It may be leaving enough PO4 to feed the Big B.

This is how I won:

-Cleaned the tank of detrius
-Pulled off all algae I could by hand

-Removed rocks I could & spot treated affected areas with Hydrogen Peroxide & scrubbed the area with a very stiff plastic brush. Treated spots again. Rinsed off rock in a tub of change salt water, shaking off additional detrius. Bry. is gone - a fresh start but a big job.

-Ran mechanical filtration. (Floss or sock cleaning frequently) it's important to catch detrius & small Bry. fragments.

-Ran GFO in a reactor and lots of it. This is no time to be a cheapskate. If you don't change it out quickly enough it will come back & you will fail - so it's best to test water with a low range phosphate meter to time replacement and keep levels as low as you can. You absolutely must not let it regain a foothold. If don't want to pay for a meter I'd change it out every 10 days in the begining. GFO doesn't kill the Bry. right away but will starve it. The real killing is done by you and the GFO keeps it from spreading and any old remnants will slowly fade away & die.

-While running the GFO I did one full tank treatment of peroxide to knock out a few small patches that were missed previously.

-During this time I used a few complimentary tactics: Less feeding, a 3 day lights out period and added a good powerhead for better flow. The most important was "blowing off" the rocks every few days and capturing the junk by mechanical filtration. Detrius sitting on a rock among the rhizomes of Bryopsis is like putting fertilizer over the root zone of garden plants.

Keep removing any little strands that may pop up here & there. Over time you can change out the GFO less often but never let it exhaust and leave it unattended because the BigB will be back if you do.

CAUTION: RESEARCH PEROXIDE USE BEFORE USING. It can harm some inverts and be hard on some corals if one is not careful, but this can be prevented. This is especially true if attempting full tank dosimg. But it is 100% non toxic and has no long term side effects. Large quantities of GFO are said to stress & imoeril some corals so you may wish to "phase it in" but I didn't have much of a problem, although I stressed & nearly killed a skunk cleaner shrimp (I would remove shrimp & crabs if I ever did full tank peroxide again).

Good luck.
 

aquaman67

Active member
NOPOX is a carbon source, right? It may be leaving enough PO4 to feed the Big B.

This is how I won:

-Cleaned the tank of detrius
-Pulled off all algae I could by hand

-Removed rocks I could & spot treated affected areas with Hydrogen Peroxide & scrubbed the area with a very stiff plastic brush. Treated spots again. Rinsed off rock in a tub of change salt water, shaking off additional detrius. Bry. is gone - a fresh start but a big job.

-Ran mechanical filtration. (Floss or sock cleaning frequently) it's important to catch detrius & small Bry. fragments.

-Ran GFO in a reactor and lots of it. This is no time to be a cheapskate. If you don't change it out quickly enough it will come back & you will fail - so it's best to test water with a low range phosphate meter to time replacement and keep levels as low as you can. You absolutely must not let it regain a foothold. If don't want to pay for a meter I'd change it out every 10 days in the begining. GFO doesn't kill the Bry. right away but will starve it. The real killing is done by you and the GFO keeps it from spreading and any old remnants will slowly fade away & die.

-While running the GFO I did one full tank treatment of peroxide to knock out a few small patches that were missed previously.

-During this time I used a few complimentary tactics: Less feeding, a 3 day lights out period and added a good powerhead for better flow. The most important was "blowing off" the rocks every few days and capturing the junk by mechanical filtration. Detrius sitting on a rock among the rhizomes of Bryopsis is like putting fertilizer over the root zone of garden plants.

Keep removing any little strands that may pop up here & there. Over time you can change out the GFO less often but never let it exhaust and leave it unattended because the BigB will be back if you do.

CAUTION: RESEARCH PEROXIDE USE BEFORE USING. It can harm some inverts and be hard on some corals if one is not careful, but this can be prevented. This is especially true if attempting full tank dosimg. But it is 100% non toxic and has no long term side effects. Large quantities of GFO are said to stress & imoeril some corals so you may wish to "phase it in" but I didn't have much of a problem, although I stressed & nearly killed a skunk cleaner shrimp (I would remove shrimp & crabs if I ever did full tank peroxide again).

Good luck.


What's a 'full tank treatment" with peroxide?
 

eddiereefs

New member
Its when u dose a tank with peroxide 1ml per ten gal is the accepted rate. It has been proven to work on dinos but is shown to kill free floating algae in water coloum.
 
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