NY Times Today

SteveL

New member
Weird .... best do a search under NY Times and hit the link that is in a few other threads on RC today. It's working sometimes but then not on others - no idea why. Of course you could also run down to the gas station and pick up a hard copy if I've peaked your interest enough.

It's a multi-page spread on captive propagation to re-seed the Florida reefs.
 

drbronx

Premium Member
Very cool article. Thanks Steve. Its great what this guy is doing. I always thought it would be interesting to see if we could use our systems to raise corals to be used to re-seed depleted reefs. When I dive in the the keys, I never see living staghorn or elkhorn corals though I often see rubble 'forests" where they once lived. Is it possible to obtain frags of native offshore sps species? They are not as colorful as South Pacific species and I don't believe they are available since they are protected. Nontheless it would make for an interesting project, especially if they can be used for a re-seeding program.
 

fatrip

Yup That Stuff
great link....good thing they were "grown on iron pipes " not PVC we wouldnt want that to happen now...lol...just thought it was funny that they made that mistake...srry i have bad humor.. but great article none the less...
 
Thanks for the good read, Steve.
Several things I noticed about the grow out tank in that article make me wonder if any scientists growing corals in the lab get any information (directly or inderctly) from reef aquarium hobbyists or sites such as RC.
Don't laugh. 99% of the threads on this board are "fluff", but if you know what keywords to use in a search there's a lot of relevent information to be found...
 

acdraindrps

New member
Gary

I have to disagree with your comment about 99% of the threads here being 'fluff.' I find almost every thread I read to be helpful in some way.

Yes, one can say that the majority of the people who post here are not experts in the saltwater aquarium hobby.... On the other hand if you read threads while keeping this in mind one can pick and choose what to believe, or what not to. While the hobby has come a long way, there are still a lot of mysteries here and who is to say whats right or wrong?

Anyway, what I'm trying to say is that its not fair to say 99% of the threads here are gabage when I find message boards to be one of the best sources of information for newbies and seasoned veterans alike.

I would say more like 50% is fluff :rollface:
 

SteveL

New member
Gary:

I know some of the guys at Cornell are on here. They lurk but eye's are watching you - be warned.

Did you notice in the article mention of oyster eggs (larvae) to feed the corals?
 
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=9865443#post9865443 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by SteveL
Gary:

I know some of the guys at Cornell are on here. They lurk but eye's are watching you - be warned.

Did you notice in the article mention of oyster eggs (larvae) to feed the corals?
I noticed that and it's what prompted me to post what I did :)

Now you have me concerned with who's watching :worried2:
 

SteveL

New member
Per the earlier comment about growing on "iron pipes" - that may be not as crazy as it immediately seems - at least for ocean aquaculture efforts. There is at least one group using metal scaffolding attached to a low voltage power supply. Objective as I understand it is to set up a cathode/anode to facilitate calcium deposition. Personally I don't buy-it as the mechanism of calcium deposition is chemical/biological rather than physical in my book. Anyway those who have pioneered the effort to build artificial reefs claim success.

Don't get me wrong - I too think it was an error in observation by the reporter in this case.

SteveL
 
they use a similar idea with electrical low voltage to stimulate bone growth in patients with broken bones.

Works on the same principle the electrical voltage stimulates growth in the the bone and produces healing and stronger bones at the point of the break
 
Top