Anyone run salinity over 1.026?

Ssteve

New member
Have a respected source tell me he has been running around 1.028-1.029 for a few years now and his sps seem to love it. Wondering if its a tank where he can get away with it cause his stuff is acclimated to it, or if anyone else has tried keeping their tanks over 1.026 and seen benefits?
 

MondoBongo

Obligate Feeder Obsessed
i don't know if i would say i have seen any benefits, but i haven't seen any drawbacks.

for the last few months my tank has been about 36 - 37ppt, with translates to ~1.027 - 1.028sg just due to where things ended up falling.

the red sea can attain much higher salinity than that, as high as 41ppt or ~1.031sg.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Sea

so the measurements your source gave you certainly aren't anything outlandish.
 

Rakie

New member
A very few people do and have, but as mentioned above, in some specific areas salinity can raise up to higher than we'd normally feel comfortable with.

Years and years ago, 1.026 was considered a little high, as 1.024/5 was 'perfect', now everyone runs at .026 -- Maybe in 10 years we'll be running 1.030 or something.
 

Ssteve

New member
I just know Adam at battlecorals runs his real high and has some of the best sps's I have seen. Seems like it can't hurt.
 

Rakie

New member
I just know Adam at battlecorals runs his real high and has some of the best sps's I have seen. Seems like it can't hurt.

What's 'real high', could you elaborate?

EDIT: Checked his site, he runs his at 1.027 --- That's very minimally raised, as defacto is 1.026
 
The higher the salinity the higher concentrations of Cal, Alk, and Mg you are adding with water changes. It can help a little, especially with trace minerals and when you have quite a bit growing. It isn't a huge difference, but going from 1.025 to 1.027-28 can be a 10% difference. If your parameters were 10% higher and water changes helped pull them back up to that point, would that make a difference for your corals? It you already dose then you might not notice a difference, but if your parameters are a little low it could make a big difference. Many people do not dose trace minerals so that little boost could help if you need it.
 

Ssteve

New member
The higher the salinity the higher concentrations of Cal, Alk, and Mg you are adding with water changes. It can help a little, especially with trace minerals and when you have quite a bit growing. It isn't a huge difference, but going from 1.025 to 1.027-28 can be a 10% difference. If your parameters were 10% higher and water changes helped pull them back up to that point, would that make a difference for your corals? It you already dose then you might not notice a difference, but if your parameters are a little low it could make a big difference. Many people do not dose trace minerals so that little boost could help if you need it.

That makes a lot of sense, thank you for that.
 
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