Carbon of the Biopellets

Johnyman

New member
Hello all.

My friends and I had a discussion about the situation:

When we talk about the carbon BioPellets're assuming the atom C and not carbon dioxide (CO2) right? Can BioPellets releasing carbon ( C ) in the water column? and becomes CO2 in contact with water? I ask this because there are reports saying that BioPellets reduce Ph and i suppose it can be because de CO2 but this CO2 is generated by the release of the carbon into the water like i said or the Co2 is generated by the consuming by the bacterias?

Thank you!
Best Regards
Joao Tomas
 
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Dr. Reef

Dr. Reef at ur service
RC Sponsor
i am not a chemist so i cant tell u the reaction but its possible and that's probably why its recommended to run the outlet of the biopellet reactor to skimmer or near the intake of skimmer.
 

ReachTheSky

Active member
Biopellet polymers are not composed of just carbon. They are far more complex than that. I don't believe they release carbon molecules into your water either. Carbon does not turn into carbon dioxide in your water column. If that were the case, people running carbon filters would wipe out their tanks. The CO2 comes from the bacteria on the pellets and it will lower pH as a result. If you have a good skimmer and decent aeration, that's negligible.
 

MrClam

New member
I am not familiar with biopellets, but I can tell you that nothing can release singular carbon atoms. Chemically that is practically impossible. I would guess the biopellets release polymers of some combination of carbon and hydrogen that is biologically active (sugars, lipids ect). But again I dont know biopellets so this is just a guess.
 

Johnyman

New member
I am not familiar with biopellets, but I can tell you that nothing can release singular carbon atoms. Chemically that is practically impossible. I would guess the biopellets release polymers of some combination of carbon and hydrogen that is biologically active (sugars, lipids ect). But again I dont know biopellets so this is just a guess.

Ok, but its possible the biopellets release some kind of subtance with carbon..?
 

Johnyman

New member
Thanks for your answers.

Therefore, if the BioPellets release it some type of substance with carbon, we can say that the consuming of the bacteria and the entire process can occorrer not only the reactor, but also in the entire system?
 

ReachTheSky

Active member
If they did, you'd likely be correct but they don't. This is one of the primary differences between biopellets and vinegar/vodka/sugar dosing. The carbon source in biopellets is contained within one area while the others are free floating throughout the tank.
 

Solov

New member
If they did, you'd likely be correct but they don't. This is one of the primary differences between biopellets and vinegar/vodka/sugar dosing. The carbon source in biopellets is contained within one area while the others are free floating throughout the tank.

Actually I believe is that you're the one who is incorrect on this account. Biopellets do melt and release carbon source into the whole system (therefore are exactly like vodka in this respect). It might just also happen that they attract bacteria colonies right at the source as well, so that you can skim them more effectively by directing pellet reactor output near skimmer input.
 

ReachTheSky

Active member
I don't think is as much a case as the pellets "melting" into the water column as it is the bacteria consuming the pellets and multiplying.
 

disc1

-RT * ln(k)
Hello all.

My friends and I had a discussion about the situation:

When we talk about the carbon BioPellets're assuming the atom C and not carbon dioxide (CO2) right? Can BioPellets releasing carbon ( C ) in the water column? and becomes CO2 in contact with water? I ask this because there are reports saying that BioPellets reduce Ph and i suppose it can be because de CO2 but this CO2 is generated by the release of the carbon into the water like i said or the Co2 is generated by the consuming by the bacterias?

Thank you!
Best Regards
Joao Tomas


The carbon in biopellets is in some sort of organic molecule, carbon bound to hydrogen and likely oxygen. If it were CO2 it would be a gas and if it were elemental carbon it would either be black or it would be a diamond. I would guess that it is most likely some sort of carbohydrate polymer.

I do not know if biopellets release anything into the water, but I'm going to hazard a guess that they do at least to some small extent. It is really hard to imagine how they wouldn't.

Biopellets are consumed by bacteria, and this process (respiration) does create CO2. That happens whether the pellets dissolve into the water or not. The extra CO2 will cause the pH to drop. Good aeration and proper alkalinity levels will mostly negate that effect although there may still be a slight reduction. There would be a similar effect using any other carbon source like vodka or vinegar.
 
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