HELP, please, with my clam ID/remaining closed with light on

starshrike

New member
One (ID unknown) of my two clams has been closed a significant amount while the lights were on. Should I be worried? The Lawnmower Blenny and hermits have been picking at it today. This clam is approximately 6-7" across. Too much current? not enough/too many nutrients? I do not know what to feed them other than the PhytoFeast which I have been doing every other day so far (1/2-3/4 tsp for the entire tank)

The other (believed to be a Maxima, approximately 4-5") is basking in the light and reacts by closing if fish touch it, but otherwise remains open.

Pictures attached

Size of tank: 60 gal
Age of tank: 1 week (moved an established tank)
see details from http://reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?p=18662308
Sump: DSB, Cheato, Charcoal in a 40 gal tank, about 20-30 gal water.
Skimmer: Yes
nitrate: 0 ppm
ammonia: 0-0.25 ppm
temperature: 75-80F
Water source: RO from LFS
Salinity: 1.029 (I am aware is high, trying to lower slowly)
Alkalinity: 143.2 ppm
Lights: Not sure... full spectrum with ballasts
Calcium: 240 mg/L, added Reef Advantage to boost, should be about 270 mg/L now.
Magnesium:
Dosing: Reef Advantage Calcium, Magnesium and Carbonate
Specimen dipped [in what] or quarantined or previously treated?: None, moved entire established tank and re-set up.

Thank you!
 

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stingythingy45

New member
Hate to say it,but that clam looks dead.

This is not good.
ammonia: 0-0.25 ppm
(could be from the clam)

Clams need lots of good lighting.
This right here is one of the problems,"Lights: Not sure... full spectrum with ballasts".

I would do the smell test on the clam and if it smells really bad,remove it.
It could send your tank into a nose dive.

And do a couple good sized water changes.
 

starshrike

New member
It still looked like it was moving inside (partial extension, but not open) and retracted back, but did not open.

Lights: its a hood with LEDs (24/7), florescent tube, and MH (on 8 hrs) Not sure the exact wattage, but this was an inherited tank that was set up sucessfully for years. The clams are several years old.

Would disturbing DSB affect the clam?

Do clams routinely close for a day to digest/clean/etc?

Should I move it out of the high end of the current? The closed clam is at the end where the impeller is. The other (happy for now) maxima is out of the direct line of the current, on the opposite side of the tank.

I plan to do a partial water change today, and also bring the salinity down slowly.
 

lilalove

New member
The first looks like a derasa, the second a crocea. Sometimes they just don't like to be moved. The first doesn't look like it's in good shape, though. If you have any kind of clean up crew, they'll inform you that the clam is on it's way out.

Oh I just re-read your post. If stuff is picking at it, it is likely a goner. Bummer.
 

stingythingy45

New member
Would disturbing DSB affect the clam?

Yes,that could release lots of nitrates and other trapped organics into the system.

Do clams routinely close for a day to digest/clean/etc?

They don't really eat anything,they use photosynthesis through the mantle.
They'll close partially at night.


I would try moving it into a low flow area.But be prepared to remove the clam if it completely collapses in the shell.
 

starshrike

New member
While it is dissappointing... I realize any move for an aquarium = losses. I have never moved any freshwater aquarium and had a perfect result. Marine aquariums are already more sensitive, so I am not terribly surprised. :/

I will do a smell test later. I unfortunately am stuck at the office all this week (I usually work from home a few times a week) which makes me a paranoid mess. If it has gone off the deep end I will dispose of it... I am already planning for a partial water change today.

Realist me: What does a dead clam smell like? rotting fish? What is the accepted disposal method?

Optomistic me: If it does not smell terrible, should I move it? Quarantine? (I only have a clean 5 gal eclipse tank w/built in hood filter at the moment) Any other larger thank is occupied.
 

starshrike

New member
Current picture of large clam... has been removed though it does not "stink", smells significantly less than the local seafood section at the asian market which I realize is hardly a good comparison. No scavengers were on it, and from the picture you can see it is not fully closed.

Completed about 10% water change today, will do another tomorrow.

I am wondering as the large clam was not attached to anything after the move (not certain if it was before) but the small clam has always been attached to a small "plate". If the large clam was attached, would the stress of the detachment have caused it to die slowly? It was acting exactly like the smaller one was for a number of days/ie opening for light, closing if disturbed.
 

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sjwitt

New member
I think it should smell like fresh salt water ... as in smells like the beach. As lilalove said, if things are picking at it that's not a good sign.
 

starshrike

New member
Nothing was picking at it today, only very briefly yesterday and only OUTSIDE on the shell (2 hermits) and the lawnmower blenny picks at everything, so I wasn't sure if that was part of it.

Again, it's not a noticeable odor or fishy-smelling. Smells similar to the rest of the tank (ie. saltwater). Should I place in a QT tank until I am certain? will it survive by itself?
 
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starshrike

New member
I now know most definetly what the odor smells like. RIP :(

It was in a bucket of water overnight since I was not 99% sure (I took water out for the water change, and put him/her in there, not exposing him to air at the time) and I suppose he was mostly on his way out when I removed him. This morning, said bucket reeeked.

Hopefully I removed him before he did too much decomposing damage to the rest of the tank.

Lesson was learned, I am closely monitoring the rest of the tank to minimize any additional losses.
 

stingythingy45

New member
Sorry to here this.I think you did the right thing removing it.
The other clam is probably a T Crocea.They are rock boring clams and need something to attach their byssal filaments.Some people put a flat rock or shell under them for easy removal or moving around on the sand.
 

starshrike

New member
Thanks for the ID, will help me with continuing to care for it. The remaining clam was already attached to a flat piece of rock, and is on top of the sand at the moment. It is still acting normal so I am just going to let it be for now as I do not think disturbing it too much is helpful!
 
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