Thawing food in water, rinsing and re-freezing

foo_dog

New member
So I thaw my frozen food each night in some tank water in a cup...I then rinse it with fresh ro/di saltwater and give.it to the tank.

Could I do this same thing, but a whole bunch of food thawed quickly in tank water, rinsed and re-frozen so I can just break off a chunk and drop it in there or is there issues with that?

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thor109

New member
You could but why? I have a tea strainer I place in a cup. I add ro and food and remove strainer and dip in tank.
 

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Thumbster

New member
I think maybe he might not have the time to thaw, strain, re-strain, re-strain and then feed in the morning when it would be MUCH easier to just plop a piece of precleaned food into the tank.

To OP, I have no idea and honestly unless a food expert answered the question definitively as to the breakdown of frozen foods, I would be skeptical. Although I am sure it is possible to do. I have eaten things that have been frozen twice, it does effect the taste.
 

foo_dog

New member
I think maybe he might not have the time to thaw, strain, re-strain, re-strain and then feed in the morning when it would be MUCH easier to just plop a piece of precleaned food into the tank.

To OP, I have no idea and honestly unless a food expert answered the question definitively as to the breakdown of frozen foods, I would be skeptical. Although I am sure it is possible to do. I have eaten things that have been frozen twice, it does effect the taste.


Correct...plus, I could add selco, garlic and vita chem before freezing and then I can just drop and go: -)...

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Ron Reefman

New member
I don't see any big issue as long as you don't leave it thawed out for very long and make sure it's completely refrozen (having been in saltwater may make freezing it harder to do). It may affect the taste, but if the fish and inverts eat it, do you really care that much? I eat stuff all the time that my wife cooks and I don't like the taste... Oops! Did I say that out loud? :headwally: Looks like PB&J sandwiches for dinner tonight.
 

Randy Holmes-Farley

Reef Chemist
Premium Member
There may be other reasons to do this (you mention the additions you may want to make), but the idea that folks are doing something especially useful with respect to phosphate by rinsing foods is seriously flawed.

Rinsing foods for that reason is not useful. I show that in an upcoming Advanced Aquarist article. Here's an excerpt about a hypothetical example:

we find that phosphate that was rinsed away would have boosted the “in tank” phosphate concentration by 0.12 mg/379 L = 0.0003 ppm. That amount washed away does not seem significant with respect to the “in tank” target level of about 50-100 times that level (say, 0.015 to 0.03 ppm), nor does it seem significant relative to the total amount of phosphate actually added each day in foods (which is perhaps 50-1000 times as much, based on input rates from Table 4. Again, the conclusion I make is that rinsing is not really worthwhile, in my opinion.
 

jgsteven

New member
There may be other reasons to do this (you mention the additions you may want to make), but the idea that folks are doing something especially useful with respect to phosphate by rinsing foods is seriously flawed.

Rinsing foods for that reason is not useful.

Awesome! I have never rinsed my frozen food out of laziness, now I no longer have to feel bad about it. :)

Additionally, I can make the logical leap that all of the other things I am lazy about are similiarily justified... :celeb1:
 

tebstan

New member
I don't rinse food, but I do partially thaw and re-freeze to make my own mix of stuff.

I put all the various cubes I want in a tupperware, and float the container in a sink full of room temperature water. When it's sufficiently mushy I stir it up and poor it in mini silicone cube trays.

I was worried about the thaw/re-freeze, so asked Reef Nutrition. Basically, the folks there said that every time something is re-frozen, some cells burst, degrading the food slightly but not necessarily causing much harm to the overall quality.
 
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