Halodule wrightii flower!

Samala

New member
Hi gang,

Interesting development from my Halodule wrightii and Halophila engelmannii dominated 20gallon display. One of the Halodule plants has decided to produced a flower!

<img border=1 height=450 width=600 src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v285/slardizabal/duleflower2.jpg">

Very exciting. It doesnt show well in these pics as it is really quite small.. I'd say 1/2" or 1 - 1.5 cm tall for the flower structure itself. It also has a slight reddish tinge to it, much like male flowers from Halophila engelmannii. I think this is a female flower, as shoal grass's female flowers are reported to be sessile and produced very close to the ground as well as being enclosed by leafy sheaths. This flower occurs maybe two inches above the soil, and the sheaths do seem to be 'enclosing' it. I dont see any filaments or anything else yet. Might ask a few seagrass biologists about it to verify which type it is.

I think water temperature, as in star grass, may have sparked this occurrence. It has been rather mild here for many weeks, despite it being summer but has just recently started to be a little warmer continuously. Might be the trigger.

We'll see what develops or if the other plants decide to follow suit. This is the second species to flower in my tanks.

>Sarah
 

kowalski

New member
Hi... My name is Joseph Kowalski and am a research associate at The University of Texas - Pan American (Kowalski@utpa.edu) and a graduate student at Texas A&M University Corpus Christi. I study seagrasses, and Halodule, in particular. My reason for writing you is to unquire as to your photograph of a Halodule flower (it looks like a female). Specifically, if you are willing to help me, I'd like to know what the tips looks like. Does it have a medial point, along with two lateral points, or just two lateral points that rise well above the center line of the leaf? Thanks much for the photograph.
 

NeilFox

New member
Hopefully Kowalski will still get an answer. I love when the hobby can contribute to science. It is a validation of what we do...
 
Top