New calcium reactor ?

Mr.Fishtank

New member
Been dosing 2 part since I started reefing and just decided to switch to a calcium reactor for a more stable system. I went with GEO's 612 model for my reefer 450 sps dominated tank. I am using the Reef Fanatic's regulator. I got it all set up a few days ago and have it dialed in pretty close but find that the ph in the reactor isn't steady. I have it set to turn on at 7.0 and off at 6.9. It will take about 10-15 mins for the ph to drop down but when the solenoid shuts off the ph raises fairly quick. Only like 5 min then it will trigger the solenoid to turn back on. I have tried to lower the co2 ever so slightly but if I do the ph just stays where it is at.

I guess my question is, am I doing something wrong? I have read that the solenoid should only turn on a few times a day. I should also mention that I am doing the method where the effluent rate is measured in ml not drips. I have my flow set to 80 ml per min.
 

hkgar

Active member
The only control you want for the CO2 regulator is to shut off the regulator if dKH is 6,3. Do not set a high shut off. By sdjusting PSI and bubble count the dKH will stabilize around a number.

"Step 2)
Then adjust the pH within the reactor to approximately pH 6.5 to 6.7 for dissolving the medium. First, measure the pH of the effluent exiting the reactor with a test kit or pH probe (I recommend a pH meter as most pH test kits are not sufficiently accurate). If the pH is too high, reduce the effluent flow rate; if the pH is too low, increase it. Allow a few hours for the reactor to respond to the changes, and repeat this step until the pH value is between 6.5 and 6.7."

http://www.reefkeeping.com/issues/2002-05/sh/feature/
 

Mr.Fishtank

New member
Thanks for the reply. My intention was to do this method https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gwlvfgDvQqg. I like the idea of a higher effluent flow to reduce the chance of clogging issues. I understand that having it set up this way will increase the ph inside the reactor faster. I just can't seem to hold the ph stable. My tank doesn't have a really high alk/cal demand. 1.45 dkh in 24hrs. The tank is stable at 8 dkh so the ph that I have the reactor set to seems to be working.

I know the solenoid shouldn't be triggering so often so I'm trying to dial in the co2 rate so it will stay steady.

So a properly setup reactor will have the ph stable at a given value with the co2 always on and only shutting off if ph drops too low?
 

jamie1981

New member
So a properly setup reactor will have the ph stable at a given value with the co2 always on and only shutting off if ph drops too low?[/QUOTE said:
Yes which is why a controller is not necessary. I've ran calcium reactors for close to 10 years and never used a controller on them.
 

jamie1981

New member
Here's my current CA setup a Korallin C10002 with a 2nd upflow chamber that I built myself. That's a 5lb Co2 tank.
 

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Mr.Fishtank

New member
Thanks. I just wanted to be sure. I have lowered my ph down to 6.85 as being my shut off. And increased the bubble rate just enough to where the ph is staying at 6.89-6.91. I check alk daily so we'll see how it goes. If the ph starts to climb I'll bump up the co2 again.
 

hkgar

Active member
Yes which is why a controller is not necessary. I've ran calcium reactors for close to 10 years and never used a controller on them.

Exactly, why can't so many folks understand this. I have an Apex and ter regulator command line is

If RXph < 6.30 Then OFF

GET RID of the high shut off!

That's it.

If you eliminate the high off the ph will find its level and stay there. If dKH is increasing dial back the PSI or bubble count until dKH stays level.
 

Optionman

New member
View attachment 385690

Here is a 24 hour graph of my CArx Ph probe. I have the regulator set to turn on at 6.7 and off at 6.45. Drip rate of effluent is 1-2 drops/second. This has been running successfully for 18 months with only minor tweaks. Any issues (clogged line, exhausted CO2, loss of siphon) immediately reveals itself via the apex graph which is very helpful.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

bertoni

Premium Member
I agree that a 0.1 unit range is far too small. I can't comment much on the value of the high-pH control point. It shouldn't be required, since you can use the carbon dioxide regulator for that.
 

Optionman

New member
If both methods result in stable tank Alk, it comes down to personal choice I guess. Not sure if one method uses more CO2 and/or CA media then other.


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