Resealing a 220g tank, need advice

The Reef Addict

New member
Hello!

Haven't been on here in a long time! Just as the title says, I need some advice. I picked up a free 220g tank that needs a reseal. It's a real nice tank that is in great shape, only a couple years old. I believe it's one of the infamous Marineland leakers.

Anyways, I have done a bunch or research but still find myself with a couple questions..

1) I am going to "do this right" and seperate all the glass panels. When I put the tank back together, do I simply put the plastic top/bottom pieces on and go about resealing? Or do I need to physically lift up the glass panels (sounds impossible/unlikely) to ensure silicone gets in between them?

2) Should I silicone the plastic braces back on first? I've only resealed one tank before and it was much older than this one. With that tank the bottom glass fit inside of the side panels and was siliconed around the bottom and top side, the bottom glass was elevated about 1" up. This tank however - looks like the the side panels may sit on top of the glass? I guess I'll have a better idea once I take it apart.

3) Any recommendations on a "tool" I could use to spread/push the silicone in between the panels?

4) Is GE silicone 1 sufficient? Seemed super strong from all the times I've used it in the past.

I believe that's all I can think of. Going to start this project tomorrow morning. TIA!!!
 

Vinny Kreyling

Premium Member
Braces go on last, after all panels are together.
Ends of panels get siliconed before any match is made.
Held together with blue painters tape.
I have seen the silicone applied with a caulking gun.
See what You Tube has.
 

The Reef Addict

New member
Braces go on last, after all panels are together.
Ends of panels get siliconed before any match is made.
Held together with blue painters tape.
I have seen the silicone applied with a caulking gun.
See what You Tube has.

A lot of YouTube videos have it "wrong" as they don't seperate all the panels. Which I have heard is vital, especially for as big of a tank as a 220. So I should separate all the panels, throuroughly clean...

- And put silicone on all the edges that "mate" together. Then, seal all the seams from the inside?! I guess I'm just wondering if I need to lift up the glass for the silicone to spread in between the panels or not.
 

wtac

Member
IMHO/E...after that, you have to install a bottom EuroBrace and find a glass company that serves chandelier makers and glass blowers to find 10mm x 10mm square glass rods and silicone them to the vertical corners.

Last I remember, they use 12mm glass (just under 1/2") that is much too thin for my comfort (former engineer) as I would use 5/8" (16mm) at a minimum. The only thing really keeping it all together is the plastic trim.

So adding the bottom EB and vertical braces is giving the glass more silicone:glass surface area adhesion.

Done this to countless ML DD aquariums and none has leaked/seam failure in the past until '18 when I retired from this business compared to other "unfortified" DD aquariums.
 

The Reef Addict

New member
Thank you for the replies. I spent all day splitting, cleaning, and stripping the tank today. I have all the panels ready for reassembly, and I managed to find/save the spacers used in between the glass. A grinder with a wire wheel made quick work of cleaning up the edges. I will look into the euro bracing as well, thank you both thus far.
 

aikenreefkeeper

New member
Reef Addict,

How did you split the panels? I purchased a used tank that leaked when I tested it. I tried to split the panels to repair and could not even get a razor knife blade between the panels.

Thanks,
 

The Reef Addict

New member
Reef Addict,

How did you split the panels? I purchased a used tank that leaked when I tested it. I tried to split the panels to repair and could not even get a razor knife blade between the panels.

Thanks,

Cut the seams from the inside first, then pick one of the top corners and work the blade back and forth at the silicone. Once the blade in between the panels you have to apply a lot of downward pressure in order to cut through. Or you could continually "jab" into he seam an inch at a time. It helps if you pull at the panels while cutting as well. Once you get one seam, the rest as cake.

I found that there are small spacers in between the panels on the corners. Make sure you save them for the rebuild. They are roughly the same width as a razor blade... Now you know why it is so difficult to get the blade in between the panels.
 
Top