Help

tewebb

New member
Just got my 75 gal tank and sump set-up with RO water. Have found no leaks. Getting ready to add the salt.

I have the All-glass 75g with the built in overflow. The down side of the tank goes into a 100 micron filter sock that is held in place by a U type clamp that is part of my sump.

The return makes a lot of noise for one thing, and I mean a lot.
And there is all this white foam that is overflowing the top of the sock and running down the inside of the sump.........What is this and why?????

I have the EV180 protein skimmer running to help break it in. I turned it off and the foam is still overflowing the sock.

Can someone help me out on this. I have a pvc down spot that run's into two 45's and then a straight piece that run's into a 90 and then straight down into the sock in the sump. I got some help on the plumming and that was the best he could do. Had to use the 90 elbow.

Any help out there???????
:confused:
 

Jay180reef

New member
A picture would help...
It sounds like your overflow water needs to slow down before arriving in your sock/sump. A few more 90degree elbows may be needed to reduce the speed of the water.
 

tewebb

New member
How do you control the speed of the down (overflow) side?

I have a ball valve on the return side hose.

Tom
 
do not add any more 90 degree elbows to your drains!
protein skimmers don't work with freshwater.
it sounds like some residual contaminents might have been in your system... you didn't wash the new aquarium with any type of detergent, did you? (Some filter socks can cause foaming. It's temporary.)

Once you get the system up and running with saltwater it takes about two weeks for a microbial film to develop on plumbing. This film will help quiet things down to a small degree. You might want to look into adding a durso or stockman to your drains if you don't have one already.
 

Jay180reef

New member
If you add a few more elbows (like in the drawing) the water won't have nearly the vertical drop to accelerate into your sump.
Of course, this is a basic drawing, try to figure out a similar way to slow your water down.
194443flow-med.JPG
 

cdbias2

Appalachian Reef Society
Premium Member
Stick a piece of hose/pvc in your drain line to extend it down into the sock and releases the water below the water level in the sock so that it isn't splashing.
 

tewebb

New member
The noise is at the sump. It's coming from the down side where the water enter's the sump/filter sock.

Tom
 

tewebb

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=14155881#post14155881 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by Gary Majchrzak
do not add any more 90 degree elbows to your drains!
protein skimmers don't work with freshwater.
it sounds like some residual contaminents might have been in your system... you didn't wash the new aquarium with any type of detergent, did you? (Some filter socks can cause foaming. It's temporary.)

Once you get the system up and running with saltwater it takes about two weeks for a microbial film to develop on plumbing. This film will help quiet things down to a small degree. You might want to look into adding a durso or stockman to your drains if you don't have one already.

What is a durso or stockman for the drains?
 

token

New member
A Durso will not silence the noise at the overflow.

Check out melev's site? He has some excellent diagrams and easy to follow pictures that will allow you to dramatically decrease the noise at the sump. Basically, you need to make sure that the water in the sump enters below the water level of your sump. If you can use a plastic container with a bunch of rubble in it, all the better.

Good luck!
 
durso or stockman won't help quiet noise happening in the sump.
JMO but I'm not a fan of bringing water into the sump below waterline. I'd keep sump drains above sump waterline and cover the sump to contain noise inside it.
 

token

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=14156603#post14156603 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by Gary Majchrzak
JMO but I'm not a fan of bringing water into the sump below waterline. I'd keep sump drains above sump waterline and cover the sump to contain noise inside it.
I am not contradicting but I chuckled at this. Here's why...

Back in the day, I had that same thought, "No way. That's just asking for trouble. Water to the sump needs to enter above the sump level."

One night, I was trying to sleep after upgrading my return pump. I had a lot more flow into a tank that had been very quiet prior to the change. I bet I doubled the flow from sump to tank. In any event, I got up and looked at the situation and knew that I could not stop the gurgling at the overflow but I thought, "Heck, I am just gonna stick that pipe under the water and see if that helps!"

Half my noise went away.

I woke up the next morning and pondered why I had never done that before as I worked to make more quiet the overflow. The only thing I could say with any certainty was that I was taught that way, so that the splashing water would help with aeration. I looked at the sump and saw the ripples on the water, tested my pH and found it to be the same and finally decided that under the water would work for me.

Given the choice, now, I always force my water to enter the sump below the water line. But that's just me and I am sure there is not a "right or wrong" thing here. Gary Majchrzak is spot on that covering the area where the noise originates is just as effective.

I probably haven't remembered that event in years.... :rolleyes:
 
listing all pros & cons of possible solutions

listing all pros & cons of possible solutions

*discharging drains underwater in the sump might lead to the creation of a flushing noise. It can also make it a real hassle to change out a filter sock. *noise (from all sources) and splashing can be eliminated by covering the sump. *discharging drains above waterline almost always improves oxygen saturation and (possibly) raises pH.

note: different people will have different priorities.
 

Jay180reef

New member
If there's air in the drain, there shouldn't be a problem with any flushing sounds, because no suction can be formed. In my durso set-up, the small hole in the top provides the air supply. This air also aerates the water entering the sump, although it's below the water level.
 

tewebb

New member
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=14161609#post14161609 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by Jay180reef
Here's a picture to describe what I'm talkin about.

194443DURSO.JPG

I believe that is what I have in my take. It's included in the overflow kit that came with my 75g All-Glass tank. I have one built in overflow. It have two water intake's and one at the top that overflow's in the overflow. The picture you drew is just like the one that is the drain into the sump. It has the cap on it with a hole in the top. There is a 90 degree snout on it with a screen.
Maybe this is what your talking about?

Tom
 
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