Regulator? Reactor? Who is stopping the CO2?

Ron Popeil

Love them clownfish.
i have a PM calcium reactor ive had for a few years and it worked great, for the most part. i decided to make it reverse flow a few weeks ago but have had problems now maintaining CO2 levels inside the chamber.

the design is very similar to this with one change:

CR422%20-1.jpg


instead of the bubble counter that goes up and then Ts into the pipe, i put just a T and have the CO2 go directly into the pipe.

my regulator now isnt able to keep a continuous flow of C02 going. it is a milwaukie regulator, and in the past ive always adjusted the macro knob to 20 lbs and then used the micro knob for a steady bubble per second. now what happens is the bubbles slow down and eventually stop coming out.

no amount of adjusting the macro and micro knobs will now allow a continuous stream of CO2. what gives? what ideas or suggestions are out there?

thank you!
 

ServantSoldier

In Memoriam
are you adding co2 into a positive or negative pressure line? My guess is you've switched the flow, and it now forcing co2 into a pressurized water fitting, where before it was on the negative (inlet to circ pump) side. I don't see how this would be a problem unless the water pressure is really inconsistent, or greater than the pressure output of your regulator, but something to consider.
 

Ron Popeil

Love them clownfish.
if you look at the picture, where the CO2 goes in is a pipe where water is being drawn from the top of the reactor into the pump and pushed up through the media through the bottom of the reactor chamber. so that would make it a negative pressure line, right? its on the pump inlet side...

at the bottom of this pipe is a feed from my reeflo dart, this should maintain a steady pressure i would think...right?

can you expand on what things i can try to test your ideas?
 

xtm

Active member
Re: Regulator? Reactor? Who is stopping the CO2?

<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=12895728#post12895728 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by Ron Popeil
instead of the bubble counter that goes up and then Ts into the pipe, i put just a T and have the CO2 go directly into the pipe.

my regulator now isnt able to keep a continuous flow of C02 going. it is a milwaukie regulator, and in the past ive always adjusted the macro knob to 20 lbs and then used the micro knob for a steady bubble per second. now what happens is the bubbles slow down and eventually stop coming out.

no amount of adjusting the macro and micro knobs will now allow a continuous stream of CO2. what gives? what ideas or suggestions are out there?

thank you!

I am about 99% sure it has nothing to do with the CO2 entry location. The CO2 supply will always have pressure on it however it is located - not to mention that your one-way CO2 valve restricts backflow so there is no reason to believe that the pressurized effluent is "fighting" against your CO2 supply. (you DO have a valve, right?)

I would go ahead and push the big knob to 40 psi and squeeze the needle valve to as low as 1 bps. See if this helps.. if not you might try to unclog your milwaukee regulator (clean it up- look up rexgrigg.com on how to do this) It's also possible that your needle valve has worn down.

Are you using a solenoid? My Milwaukee solenoid has failed once and it restricted the bubble count.. make sure this is still operational.


xtm
 

Ron Popeil

Love them clownfish.
ok, i think it did have something to do with pressure after all.

i had a valve on the flow into the reactor and another valve on the top of the reactor. typically it was full flow going in, and restricted on the out.

so i opened up the valve all the way on the top of the reactor and reduced the flow going into the reactor....this seems to now allow the CO2 rate to maintain and i can hear my solenoid clicking on and off now which is fantastic.

thanks for everyones help!!
 
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