Temporary homes for Pseudosquilla Ciliata/Gonodactylaceus ternatensis

ArmasCG

New member
I have had a 2.5-3" female Pseudosquilla ciliata in my 8 gallon biocube for a while now, but today I stumbled across a beautiful 3.5" female G. ternatensis that I couldn't pass up. It was a hitchhiker on some live rock from the pacific, and the store was selling it as a peacock, so needless to say I was pleasantly surprised at this find. It's hard to find stomatopods up here in Michigan so I made the dreaded impulse buy.

I am moving to Tampa in early January, and I am wondering if my ciliata will be fine living in a 2.5 gal tank for a couple months until I get my own place. I plan on getting larger tanks for both animals once I move, but for now I just want to make sure I am not putting them in danger.
 

Kharn

MANTISMAN
Why not keep them in large plastic tubs...

Your in the same situation as another member on here, in cases like this people need to stop thinking about their own visual enjoyment and more about the animals well being.

If its for only a couple of months why not just give them large cheap plastic buckets ?
 

ArmasCG

New member
If I have ANY problems at all with stability or anything that's the first thing I will do, I even have the buckets at ready. If it's completely impossible I will go ahead with plan Bucket. I do take meticulous care of both tanks though, and I rarely ever register even nitrate due to a combination of utilizing macro algae for nutrient export and small daily water changes. The 2.5 gal is a year old and the 8 gal is going on three, so they are both very established tanks. Plus, the both shrimp are behaving normally and don't seem to be cramped. I am mostly concerned with how much room to roam the ciliata needs to thrive, and if the animal would be stressed out by spending a couple months in a smaller tank.

TLDR i'm would like to know if I am meeting the psychological needs of the animal, and I will listen to advice if I am wrong. I know of the other thread you are talking about and my situation is completely different.
 

Calappidae

Harlequin Shrimp
I know of the other thread you are talking about and my situation is completely different.

My situation was from a system crash, it was in a big home until I had no other opinion but remove it to save everything else, completely out of my control. I thought I could've lasted long enough to get it back in it's original home and get everything else in a 125.. but apparently its not soon enough and the equiptment I intended to use meanwhile decided to go hay wire last minute. I need to upgrade to whatever asap and I just got the nessecary objects (20 gallon bucket, filter, rock) to increase rate of survival.. All I'm saying is don't hesitate to upgrade like I did.

But p. ciliata needs around a 80 L (20 gal) aquarium according to roy's list.
 
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Fartin'Gary

New member
You can easily keep them happy in separate Rubbermaid tubs. I kept my O. scyllarus for about 3 weeks in a 20 gallon tall with a bunch of live rock and 60 canister filter. It's better to just start that way than to have to move them if something goes wrong because acclimation takes time. The investment is cheap as well. Then you can just put them in the 5 gallon buckets with air bubblers and heater if needed to transport. It's just easier and much kinder to the animal.
 

ArmasCG

New member
Looks like I will have to get the tubs running today then. I still curious as to why the ciliata needs twenty gallons of space though. She is slightly longer, but doesn't seem much bigger than your average fully grown wennerae. Is she going to put on more mass at some point?
 

Fartin'Gary

New member
Looks like I will have to get the tubs running today then. I still curious as to why the ciliata needs twenty gallons of space though. She is slightly longer, but doesn't seem much bigger than your average fully grown wennerae. Is she going to put on more mass at some point?

They like to roam around a lot and need space. They actively hunt their prey.
 
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