Favorite phytoplankton?

Gordonious

New member
I need to find a species of phytoplankton and a source. I want to start culturing some to feed copepods and possibly a few filter feeding inverts. I need something affordable and by that mean I don't have the money many reefers have, but I don't want to waist money on something that will just be a head ache or unhealthy for my tanks. I've seen lots of sources, but every site selling them will tell you the species they have to sell is the best. Anyone read a really good article focusing on the best phyto for hobbyist to culture? What would you use?

Jon
 

iloveinn

Premium Member
The easiest will be DT phyto. Lots of LFS will have them and they are live, so you can start a culture from the bottle you bought (assuming the LFS took care of it and refrigerate it properly).
 

Samala

New member
Right, there's no work with using DT's directly and if you want to subculture from it you usually get a green non-motile algae.. usually that Nannochloropsis. For the purposes of growing up 'pods, this would be fine. Its not the best nutritionally of them all for saying feeding to larval fishes or using to grow out food items like BBS or rotifers. But, since 'pods are so great nutritionally on their own, it should be fine to use.

>Sarah
 

davocean

New member
I've been using Kent marine phytoplex.
I was thinking that it seemed like I got an increase of green algae on display after dosing.
Is this the green non-motile algae?
Am I correct in thinking this or is this just coincidence?
 

Gordonious

New member
Hey Samala nice to see you again. I just found out the Delaware reef club meets in Newark.... while I'm in class. :-( lol, sigh just my luck. What type would you suggest? I'd like to get something I could use to feed corals later. I want a good all around staple. I'm just getting into full out reefs after being restrained in a FOWLR situation for years and it's a snow ball effect. I can't stop reading or learning. So the possible future uses for the phyto are limitless.

davocean, you mean you've been using phytoplex for copepods? I've got some and I no longer think it's good enough for anything else... might as well use it there.
 

davocean

New member
Yeah, that's mainly what I use it for.
Just got my new fuge with miracle mud and lots of chaeto.
I've been dosing regularly lately, but I've noticed an increase in the light green algae growing on glass.
I was wondering what else I can do to increase pods w/out algae growth.
 

Sk8r

Staff member
RC Mod
I like Phytofeast. My tank is thriving with it, and I feed a lot of it: sponges, clam, dusters, and various pods are all going strong. I've got one sponge trying to be a potato.
 

Samala

New member
There is actually some debate over whether or not corals will consume phytoplankton, some of the experts who drift into the scientific forums elsewhere have suggested that corals flourish under phyto dosing because they are consuming the eventual boost in zooplankton (ie. pods) population. Not so much because they are eating the phyto. There was some suggestion that corals lacking nematocysts (though the proper genuses elude me) may be phyto consumers as phyto doesn't need to be effectively speared in order to eat it. I may have gotten that wrong though.. ;)

Honestly, if you are feeding filter feeders like sponge, feather dusters and perhaps clams (though dont quote me here!) I would not worry about the type of phytoplankton you use. Nannochloropsis and Tetraselmis are nearly fool proof, easy to culture, easy to come by (I may have a culture you can play with!), and are fine for raising pods and the other indiscriminate feeders. Now, would you get more pods if you used more nutritionally packed phyto? Perhaps. ;)

When you jump into rearing larval critters, or need to enrich Artemia (BBS) and/or rotifers for feeding out further up the food web to your desirable organisms, then its time to really needle about which phyto's are best and what mix is best. The guru's in the breeding forum here on RC would be ideal to discuss this at length and the differences in quality between say Tetraselmis, Chaetoceros, Pavlona, Thalassiosira, Isochrysis and others.

Why dont we need to hassle over feeding pods highly nutritious food? They seem to be able to manufacture plenty of HUFA's (those good fatty acids that keep fish in good health) on their own.

Three links I think you should read if you want to plunge headlong into details:

Growing phytoplanktons at home, by our Dr. Marini.
Culturing your own phytoplankton, from the old All Things Salty forum
How to avoid phyto crashes, a good Melev thread

>Sarah
 
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